Estamos contra ti, contra ella.

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Does this have some kind of idiomatic meaning'

1867 views
updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco

6 Answers

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Me supongo que se puede interpretar así. De todas formas, a veces la palabrita "ni" apenas se oye, rocco, sobre todo en ese tipo de conversaciones.

Lo mismo dice: ni contra ti ni contra ella....

NI apenas se oiría si lo dice rápido.

How does that translate into English?
That doesn't sound like being in the middle to me. That sounds more like English's "We're not taking sides" or "We're neither for nor against you or her" (We're ambivalent).

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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OK, thanks for ruling that out for me.

updated AGO 3, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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To me, "estar contra alguien" means "estar en oposición/en guerra/...".

updated AGO 3, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Me supongo que se puede interpretar así. De todas formas, a veces la palabrita "ni" apenas se oye, rocco, sobre todo en ese tipo de conversaciones.

Lo mismo dice: ni contra ti ni contra ella....

NI apenas se oiría si lo dice rápido.

updated AGO 3, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I get the literal translation, but I didn't know if it meant something like "We're in the middle between you and her." That would fit better in the context than the literal, so I thought I would ask.

updated AGO 3, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Such as...? We're against you/her.

updated AGO 3, 2009
posted by lazarus1907