HomeQ&Awhat would be a good response to- ¿Qué tal?

what would be a good response to- ¿Qué tal?

0
votes

what would be a good response to- que tal?

174691 views
updated SEP 28, 2015
edited by 0074b507
posted by wdwdw
todo igual...y tu? - elresidente, AGO 26, 2009

11 Answers

3
votes

bien gracias! y tu que tal?

updated AGO 19, 2015
edited by cmromano
posted by cmromano
2
votes

Alicia said

This question confuses me too. The meanings of ¿Qué tal? are: 1.What's up? 2.How are things? 3.How are you? 4.How do you do? In response to #1 I might say not much or nada. To #3 I'd say very well or muy bien.

Even though it appears to have many meanings to my mind it is just a greeting and requires a similar simple response. I mean if you take it to literally mean "how are you" as we say in English and then the person starts going on about their arthritis, then moves onto their irritable bowel problems and then finally their diverticular disease, etc, etc, you begin to wish you hadn´t asked, hehe.

updated AGO 19, 2015
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
Funny! - --Mariana--, AGO 25, 2009
2
votes

So I can simply say ¿Qué tal? in return. Is this correct? Hi Alicia, no you cannot.

You got to say:

bien, y tú ¿qué tal? pues ando así así...y tú qué tal?

updated AGO 19, 2015
posted by 00494d19
Heidita's answer is how I understood ¿qué tal? The response should be "Estoy bien" or something like that. - --Mariana--, AGO 25, 2009
1
vote

¿Qué tal? = How's it going? The best answers to this question is... Very good, thanks! = ¡Muy Bien, Gracias! Not so good. And You? = No tan bien. ¿Y tú? Ok= Regularenter image description here

updated SEP 27, 2015
posted by minakat
1
vote

I sometimes say "Soy gordo y feliz y muy contento." Or, "¡Oye, mi vida es loca!" Or, "Dos, tres," (while grinning and shrugging my shoulders).

Almost any reply is OK, because mostly the phrase is used among friends or at least acquaintances.

updated AGO 19, 2015
posted by 005457e3
1
vote

This question confuses me too. The meanings of ¿Qué tal? are: 1.What's up? 2.How are things? 3.How are you? 4.How do you do?

In response to #1 I might say not much or nada. To #3 I'd say very well or muy bien.

But I think you're saying it's more of a greeting that doesn't really expect an answer. Like when we say How are you? but we don't really want to know. (At least in the US I do see that a lot.)

So I can simply say ¿Qué tal? in return. Is this correct?

updated AGO 19, 2015
posted by Alicia-53
1
vote

The same: "¿Qué tal?", or "¿Qué hay?".

It is like saying "How do you do?" to another "How do you do?", except for "¿Qué tal?" is not necessarily formal.

updated AGO 19, 2015
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

Que tal is asking "whats going on, whats up, etc etc.

A proper response would be "todo va bien", or nada mucho, or solething s little mlre advanced like "he estado occupado".

Replying with estoy bien, or bien would be weird. In english that would be like asking someone "whats going on" (Que tal) and replying with "im good"( estoy bien). That would not make sense.

updated AGO 19, 2015
posted by Mtbman
Welcome to SpanishDict. Please take a moment and complete your SD profile as it relates to language. Thanks. - rac1, AGO 19, 2015
0
votes

Bien gracias! Y tú ¿ qué tal?

Except for the spelling mistakes, I agree with this answer.

Lazarus, if I say "qué tal?" to you and you answer back "qué tal?" I would certainly be surprised to say the least.

YOu can say almost anything to qué tal except qué tal.

updated AGO 27, 2009
posted by 00494d19
eso mismo - elresidente, AGO 27, 2009
0
votes

if you don't want to say bien, you could say más o menos - more or less wink

updated AGO 27, 2009
posted by lajas
in some areas, english speakers say "fair to middlin"...not bad, not great. - webdunce, AGO 25, 2009
es lo que dicen aqui en el campo - elresidente, AGO 27, 2009
0
votes

Isn't a ¿Qué tal? reply to a ¿Qué tal? question just like in English when someone says, "what's up?" and they are not necessarily looking for an answer (just in passing) and you reply, "what's up?" back.

updated AGO 25, 2009
posted by Incógnito
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