HomeQ&A"beer money"???

"beer money"???

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is there an expression in spanish that means ---| a little bit of cash to get something you really want.... like "beer money".... thanks!

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updated AGO 1, 2009
posted by Rio16

15 Answers

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I think we don't have a word for that here in Spain. confused

I just asked a friend from Spain, who said the same thing.

"Remember we were still with absolutism when you were approving your Constitution. So people were either poor or very rich... Not in the middle to have 'beer money'"

I suggested "un poco de reserva", to which the reply was: "Not bad, but that would be more money you keep just in case things go bad..'Para caprichos' could be an option."

updated AGO 1, 2009
posted by Goyo
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Hmm, thanks but that sounds like you are saying that it's money thrown away - down the drain, in the trash. Maybe you feel that way about spending money for beer!! Ok - what I am looking for is a phrase that means a small amount of change that you would need to buy something ---| Pocket Money.... Money for a Rainy Day.... "dough" for pizza (double meaning with 'dough" meaning money). Are there any Spanish phrases where the word for money or "change" has double duty like that...'Yes, Rio, you caught my drift. I don't know a good answer for your question, but I thought I would seize on an opportunity for a little soapbox humor. grin Hang in there, someone will be able to answer it soon.

I always said that if I ever come into a fortune I would spend 90% of it
on booze and waste the rest. ken.
P.S. only joking folks.

updated JUL 30, 2009
posted by kenwilliams
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Just to complicate matters, when I was a teenager (which was a while ago), "mad money" was primarily used to refer to the "emergency funds" that a girl was advised to take when going on a date (it was meant to be insurance against the date turning out badly [he got mad at her/she got mad at him/they each got mad at the other) and was the "taxi fare" (or whatever) that would allow her to get home safely after dumping him (being dumped by him).

A Google search mostly return references to a TV program entitled "Mad Money" where an (alternative) meaning for "mad" is assumed e.g. frivolous/insane/capricious. However, the preemption of an established meaning by a TV show is not an unusual occurrence.

I've heard of both contexts. Just to show you how ancient I am, when I was a lad, girls wore "penny loafers" (as did boys). A penny loafer had a slot (where the laces would normally be) where a penny was placed (for good luck). A girl on a date always carried a dime in her penny loafer to call home if she became stranded on a date. That was the price of a public phone call back then. It would seem that women didn't trust men back then. Now girls always carry a cell phone. The fact that they don't trust men (or their own ability to assess one) will probably never change. I'm not sure whether that is saying someone about them or us.

updated JUL 30, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Just to complicate matters, when I was a teenager (which was a while ago), "mad money" was primarily used to refer to the "emergency funds" that a girl was advised to take when going on a date (it was meant to be insurance against the date turning out badly [he got mad at her/she got mad at him/they each got mad at the other) and was the "taxi fare" (or whatever) that would allow her to get home safely after dumping him (being dumped by him).

Yes, exactly!

updated JUL 30, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
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Not limosna then, I found this word used in a different way.

however, I did find this thread:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php't=951318

I think we don't have a word for that here in Spain. confused

We would also say: un poco de reserva, algo de cambio en el bolsillo....hmmm, no se me ocurre nada, a ver si dice algo Laza.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Just to complicate matters, when I was a teenager (which was a while ago), "mad money" was primarily used to refer to the "emergency funds" that a girl was advised to take when going on a date (it was meant to be insurance against the date turning out badly [he got mad at her/she got mad at him/they each got mad at the other) and was the "taxi fare" (or whatever) that would allow her to get home safely after dumping him (being dumped by him).

A Google search mostly return references to a TV program entitled "Mad Money" where an (alternative) meaning for "mad" is assumed e.g. frivolous/insane/capricious. However, the preemption of an established meaning by a TV show is not an unusual occurrence.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by samdie
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Hmm, thanks but that sounds like you are saying that it's money thrown away - down the drain, in the trash. Maybe you feel that way about spending money for beer!! Ok - what I am looking for is a phrase that means a small amount of change that you would need to buy something ---| Pocket Money.... Money for a Rainy Day.... "dough" for pizza (double meaning with 'dough" meaning money). Are there any Spanish phrases where the word for money or "change" has double duty like that...'Yes, Rio, you caught my drift. I don't know a good answer for your question, but I thought I would seize on an opportunity for a little soapbox humor. grin Hang in there, someone will be able to answer it soon.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Sorry I'm just catching up on this thread, I didn't refresh my browser. "Mad money" is exactly the kind of expression I am looking for. Money that you spend on something slightly frivolous, or "extra".... (thus the "beer money"). I don't mean an actual translation, but something in spanish with the same meaning as "mad money".... THANK YOU SO M UCH!

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by Rio16
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Hmm, thanks but that sounds like you are saying that it's money thrown away - down the drain, in the trash. Maybe you feel that way about spending money for beer!! Ok - what I am looking for is a phrase that means a small amount of change that you would need to buy something ---| Pocket Money.... Money for a Rainy Day.... "dough" for pizza (double meaning with 'dough" meaning money). Are there any Spanish phrases where the word for money or "change" has double duty like that...'

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by Rio16
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POCO DINERO PARA COMPRAR UNAS CERVEZAS, CHANGING THE WORD CERVEZAS TO WHAT IT IS YOU DESIRE EXAMPLE COMIDA (FOOD) (PANALES) DIAPERS AND SO ON. HOPE THIS HELPS YOU OUT .

I don't believe so. I agree with Valerie that beer money is "mad" money in the sense that it is for a frivolous indulgence. "Mad money", however, is usually a larger amount than you normally carry around as "spending money" and is for luxurious indulgences. "Beer money" is usually considered a trivial amount spent on an indulgence. Is the small amount left over after paying for food and diapers that you can waste on a non-staple.
I'm still waiting for the Spanish definition of beer money.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Hello, Tony, and welcome to the forums.

Please have a quick read of the Forum Rules, and notice that we do not type in ALL CAPS here, as that equates to YELLING.

Good to have you, and we look forward to seeing more posts from you.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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HELLO VALERIE MY NAME IS EDWARD BUT I GO BY " TONY " ,YOU ARE DEAD RIGHT. LIMOSNAS PERTAINS TO A PANHANDLER ON THE STREET,OR A HANDOUT FROM A CHARITY,BUT THAT STILL DOES NOT ANSWER RIO'S QUESTION ABOUT HOW TO ASK FOR A LITTLE CASH TO PURCHASE SOMETHING. I PERSONALLY DO NOT RELY ON THE TRANSLATOR FOUND HERE ON SPANISH DICT! MEANING IT JUST DOES NOT WORK.THE WAY TO ASK IN SPANISH FOR A STIPPEND WOULD BE TO SAY ,DAR ME POR FAVOR POCO DINERO PARA COMPRAR UNAS CERVEZAS, CHANGING THE WORD CERVEZAS TO WHAT IT IS YOU DESIRE EXAMPLE COMIDA (FOOD) (PANALES) DIAPERS AND SO ON. HOPE THIS HELPS YOU OUT .

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by edward-redmond
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Well, we would say:

limosnas

He refused to take beer money.

Se negó a aceptar limosnas.

Heidi are you sure? I understood him to mean what I would call "mad money"... some money I can use for what ever I want... my "spending money" fund. I thought "limnosas" was more like money given as charity to someone in need.

updated JUL 28, 2009
posted by Valerie
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beer money = una gran pérdida, or, dinero tirado en la basura cool grin

puffffff, este hombre no sabe lo que es bueno!! smirk

Well, we would say:

limosnas

He refused to take beer money.

Se negó a aceptar limosnas.

this is one of the words. How would you use that in a sentence'

updated JUL 27, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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beer money = una gran pérdida, or, dinero tirado en la basura cool grin

updated JUL 27, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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