Carro o coche

5
votes

which is most commonly used in Spain - el carro or el coche?

8945 views
updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by hcjc

8 Answers

10
votes

In Spain, only "coche" is used for the modern vehicle. The word "carro" is used only for carriages pulled by horses.

Funny enough, "coche" was the Hungarian name for a line of horse cars produced in the village of Kocs (from where the name "coche" comes from), where the first luxury cars (pulled by horses) with suspensions where ever built. English took this word for "coach", and Spain took it for modern cars.

updated JUN 14, 2011
edited by lazarus1907
posted by lazarus1907
Hm, a very nice and interesting etymologic explanation.
Yes good explanation Lazarus :) were (not where) ever built :) a typo I am sure :)
2
votes

I have quite a few mexican friends and they all use the word "carro". I think it depends on which country you are from whether you would use "coche" or "carro".

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by renaerules
2
votes

in mexico, I've heard both used about 50%-50%. Seems age dependent. My older relatives use coche and the youger use carro. But..............they all use "cochera" for the open roofed are where you park your care. "Mi coche esta en la cochera"

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by MexGuy
1
vote

It's been my understanding that in Mexico and Central America, "carro" is used predominantly to mean an automobile, and "coche" to mean a horse and carriage. I do think that the age of the person speaking and their country of origin has a lot to do with the connotative meaning.

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by jamesbjenkins
1
vote

But if your in a supermarket then carro or carrito means cart, as in the cart that you push through the store.

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by Rey_Mysterio
1
vote

In Mexico, coche is a carriage that the horses take you on (like in one of those disney movies from back in the day where she looses her shoe.) Carro is a car.

updated FEB 18, 2010
posted by Rey_Mysterio
Perhaps that is why I notice the difference between my older relatives (65+ years) and the younger ones. Just a more common word that was used in the ealier times in Mexico. Thanks for the additional explanation.
Your Welcome.
1
vote

In central america, they seem to use carro more than coche.

updated FEB 18, 2010
edited by llolanda
posted by llolanda
0
votes

Thanks for your answer. Does the fact that you have 4 votes for it mean that 4 others agree with your reply? It is disappointing that more than a few spanish course use 'carro' to mean car.

¿Eres español?

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by hcjc