"¿Quieres que te quedas y me vaya?"

1
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Ya sé que tengo que usar indictativo cuando digo algo como "Quiero que me quedo" y subjuntivo cuando digo "quiero que te vayas"

pero qué pasa cuando you're saying two different subjects in the sentance, and repeating what somebody else says.

"So you want that you stay and I go"

"¿Entonces quieres que te quedas y me vaya?"

"¿Quieres que te quedes y me vaya?"

"¿Quieres que te quedas y me voy" (definitely not right....)

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updated AGO 16, 2009
posted by redsoxnia
Why do you write that the last sentence is definitely not right?..because of "te quedas" or with reference to "me voy"?
I think that he was saying using the indicative for both was obviously incorrect.
Thank you, Quentin, I see that ..finally!..And now also know that you would use the infinitive for the verb belonging to the subject that does not change in the subordinate clause. Lots learned!

10 Answers

1
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Regarding your question: I am pretty sure you have to say: "¿Quieres quedarte y que me vaya?"

That's right, but here, since it is contrast you/me, you can also say "¿Quieres quedarte tú y que me vaya yo?"

In fact, I want to think that I could exclaim "Quiero que te quedas", too! Are you all saying that I can't? (well, I mean-> and be speaking proper Spanish..)

No, you can't. Unless, of course, you are talking about an item called "que te quedas", as if you said "Quiero chocolate".

updated ABR 20, 2011
edited by lazarus1907
posted by lazarus1907
:-) I understand...and will probably never forget as long as (I) "quiero chocolate"! Now maybe I won´t have to go back and reread all those examples again after all:-)
0
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Ya sé que tengo que usar indictativo cuando digo algo como "Quiero que me quedo" y subjuntivo cuando digo "quiero que te vayas"

pero qué pasa cuando you're saying two different subjects in the sentance, and repeating what somebody else says.

"So you want that you stay and I go"

"¿Entonces quieres que te quedas y me vaya?"

"¿Quieres que te quedes y me vaya?"

"¿Quieres que te quedas y me voy" (definitely not right....)

First of all: If there is no change of subject in the sentence, you should use the infinitive. So, you should say "Quiero quedarme." You are right with "Quiero que te vayas." You are not declaring that the person is going away, you are simply saying that that is what you want, thus you use the subjunctive with "te vayas."

Regarding your question: I am pretty sure you have to say: "¿Quieres quedarte y que me vaya?" I am not 100% sure about this, however, because the use of the infinitive and then the subordinate clause seems a little awkward. Let's wait for a native to clarify.

updated AGO 16, 2009
posted by Nick-Cortina
Thanks for the bit about the infinitive! What an interesting thread this has been.
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Lacking the "feeling" for this just yet, I will nonetheless have to vote for:

"¿Entonces quieres que te quedas y me vaya?"

...and go back to listen to those examples some more.

Well, if we break it up into: "Do you want to stay?" and "Do you want me to go away/leave?" you would get: "Entonces, ¿quieres quedarte?"(Remember, use the infinitive if there is no change of subject) "¿Quieres que me vaya?"

The awkward/hard part is combining the two into one sentence, since the use of the infinitive and then the subordinate clause in the same sentence does not seem right, as I have said. Where's Lazarus when you need him?! tongue wink

updated AGO 16, 2009
edited by Nick-Cortina
posted by Nick-Cortina
0
votes

so, have we come to any conclusions on how to say this?

I think I have.

Sitting on pins and needles is pretty uncomfortable and Nick's response nudged me to go pull down my first book of lessons....I guess I should review them all! I reread the introduction to the subjunctive: (ps, I hope I get this right because I am translating from a textbook which is itself not in English)...I will avoid using quotes for what I write next:

--Explanations of the subjunctive as a form to express "possibility" or "not-reality" can lead astray. Que + subjunctivo follows expressions of feeling: joy, annoyance, indifference, etc..--

There is more, of course, but a lesson book presents the material step by step. So I went to the next lesson. There I found

--further functions of the subjunctive--: --Subjunctivo is found/used in a "that" clause that follows expressions of wishing or hope.

And of course querer was printed right there on the page in the biggest, boldest, blackest type. Plus the book gives lots of examples using querer, each one with a "that" clause with its verb in the subjunctive.

Lacking the "feeling" for this just yet, I will nonetheless have to vote for:

"¿Entonces quieres que te quedas y me vaya?"

...and go back to listen to those examples some more.

updated AGO 16, 2009
edited by Janice
posted by Janice
0
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so, have we come to any conclusions on how to say this?

updated AGO 16, 2009
posted by redsoxnia
0
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Thank you, Nick. I will probably have to learn to "feel" this "Quiero que te quedes." I still even have trouble sometimes hearing whether someone has said "a" or "e" in such a last syllable when that someone is speaking "fast" (i.e., normally).

But in due time....or so I hope.

updated AGO 16, 2009
posted by Janice
0
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You definitely can't say "Quiero que te quedas". As Lazarus always says, you must use the subjunctive when you can't declare something. When you say "I want you to stay", can you declare that the other person will stay? No, that is only what you want, so it can't be declared and the subjunctive is mandatory, making it: "Quiero que te quedes".

updated AGO 16, 2009
posted by Nick-Cortina
But somehow...well, this is all so new...it seems to me that what the person is asking is do "you" want..I mean they are not saying "I want", or?
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...I will sit on pins and needles waiting for a definitive answer to this question....I really, really want to think that one could use "me voy"...but, of course, have no idea why I should think that at all.

In fact, I want to think that I could exclaim "Quiero que te quedas", too! Are you all saying that I can't? (well, I mean-> and be speaking proper Spanish..)

updated AGO 16, 2009
edited by Janice
posted by Janice
0
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And wouldn't "vaya" be without the reflexive? "¿Quieres que te quedes y (yo) vaya?"

I think that you are thinking in English.

...that you stay and [that] I go. (because we equate go with leave)

ir=to go

irse=to leave

Think of the sentence as Spanish does: ...that you stay and [that] I leave.

As Lazarus puts it: I go? I go where? If you use go you have to say where you are going.

leave (you don't have to know where you are leaving to, but where you are leaving from - commonly "here", implied).

I agree with you about the both verbs in the dependent clause being subjunctive.

I want that ...subordinate clause

If the clause requires a subjunctive verb, than all the verbs in the clause would be subjunctive.

I have no idea if that's true, it just seem logical to me.

updated AGO 15, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
0
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(I want to answer this to see if I'm catching on or not...but wait for someone who really knows...)

Wouldn't they both be in the subjunctive? And wouldn't "vaya" be without the reflexive? "¿Quieres que te quedes y (yo) vaya?"

updated AGO 15, 2009
posted by DR1960