HomeQ&A'I want the black female puppy.?

'I want the black female puppy.?

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Could someone please help me...

I need to know how to say this so I can buy my younger sister a puppy off a nice Spanish lady who is selling puppies. She dosn't know any English so a translation would be nice, translate this for me please

"I want the black female puppy."

Thanks in advance for your translation!

6106 views
updated JUL 26, 2009
posted by 0059b488

30 Answers

0
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http://www.spanishdict.com/audio.php'word=quiera&lang=sp

No need to argue.

Just change the last sound to 'oh'.

updated AGO 11, 2009
edited by Nathaniel
posted by Nathaniel
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Okay Samide,

Lighter could be defined as like Spanish "A" sounds like (With English pronouncing) "AH" that is the type of stuff that we are talking about, does that make since now''

updated JUL 26, 2009
posted by eric_collins
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Most of the English pronouncing is lighter than in Spanish
As a native speaker of English and a (reasonably) proficient speaker of Spanish (since we're talking about pronunciation)), I have no idea what you mean by "lighter".

updated JUL 25, 2009
posted by samdie
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You're welcome! smile

updated JUL 25, 2009
posted by eric_collins
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Well no that is not off topic because that is what I have been talking about to lazarus here recently.

I really need to read more of the previous posts! smile Thanks for the affirmation that I am not too crazy.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by Jason7R
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Most of the English pronouncing is lighter than in Spanish

'Lighter' defined as...?

Our b is softer, our t is softer, our c is softer, our d is softer,...

I'm curious.

In English the letter "C" is pronounced like "Sí" and the Spanish "A" is alot harder than the English "a" so mabey not every word but there are some that are lighter than in Spanish. It looks like the English "C' is softer because it does not take as long to say it as in the Spanish "C' is like "Say" and as what I said about the English "C"

In regards to the "C" I have noticed that the way it is pronounced when it is before an "i" or an "e" that the C sound is like a "th" in english. I never knew this and had always pronounced it like an "s" sound. I know it is a little off topic but I thought it was interesting. smile

Not quite, Jason. The soft "C" in Spanish (before "i" & "e") has a sound similar to the English "S" sound. It is the Spanish "Z" that has a sound similar to the hard (non-vocal) "th" sound in English, and that only in Spain and maybe a few other places. Everywhere I have been in North, Central, and South America where Spanish is spoken, there is very little difference between the pronunciation of "S", "C", and "Z". In fact, it is very common to see misspellings involving substitution among these three letters.

Interesting thank you for your input. smile

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by Jason7R
0
votes

Most of the English pronouncing is lighter than in Spanish

'Lighter' defined as...?

Our b is softer, our t is softer, our c is softer, our d is softer,...

I'm curious.

In English the letter "C" is pronounced like "Sí" and the Spanish "A" is alot harder than the English "a" so mabey not every word but there are some that are lighter than in Spanish. It looks like the English "C' is softer because it does not take as long to say it as in the Spanish "C' is like "Say" and as what I said about the English "C"

In regards to the "C" I have noticed that the way it is pronounced when it is before an "i" or an "e" that the C sound is like a "th" in english. I never knew this and had always pronounced it like an "s" sound. I know it is a little off topic but I thought it was interesting. smile

Not quite, Jason. The soft "C" in Spanish (before "i" & "e") has a sound similar to the English "S" sound. It is the Spanish "Z" that has a sound similar to the hard (non-vocal) "th" sound in English, and that only in Spain and maybe a few other places. Everywhere I have been in North, Central, and South America where Spanish is spoken, there is very little difference between the pronunciation of "S", "C", and "Z". In fact, it is very common to see misspellings involving substitution among these three letters.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Well no that is not off topic because that is what I have been talking about to lazarus here recently.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by eric_collins
0
votes

Most of the English pronouncing is lighter than in Spanish

'Lighter' defined as...?

Our b is softer, our t is softer, our c is softer, our d is softer,...

I'm curious.

In English the letter "C" is pronounced like "Sí" and the Spanish "A" is alot harder than the English "a" so mabey not every word but there are some that are lighter than in Spanish. It looks like the English "C' is softer because it does not take as long to say it as in the Spanish "C' is like "Say" and as what I said about the English "C"

In regards to the "C" I have noticed that the way it is pronounced when it is before an "i" or an "e" that the C sound is like a "th" in english. I never knew this and had always pronounced it like an "s" sound. I know it is a little off topic but I thought it was interesting. smile

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by Jason7R
0
votes

Most of the English pronouncing is lighter than in Spanish

'Lighter' defined as...?

Our b is softer, our t is softer, our c is softer, our d is softer,...

I'm curious.

In English the letter "C" is pronounced like "Sí" and the Spanish "A" is alot harder than the English "a" so mabey not every word but there are some that are lighter than in Spanish. It looks like the English "C' is softer because it does not take as long to say it as in the Spanish "C' is like "Say" and as what I said about the English "C"

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by eric_collins
0
votes

I should have said, Intentaré el sitio ahora.

Not a big deal: it was understandable.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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¡Gracias Lazarus! Trataré el sitio ahora.

I just caught my mistake...

I should have said, Intentaré el sitio ahora.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by Jason7R
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¡Gracias Lazarus! Trataré el sitio ahora.

updated JUL 24, 2009
posted by Jason7R
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I like the site thanks!

¡Me gusto el sitio, gracias!

Try "http://www.acapela-group.com/". Not all the voices are perfect, but some of them are surprisingly accurate. Some of the Spanish reproductions are so good, that sometimes I think it is a person (sometimes it sounds artificial, of course).

updated JUL 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

The sound in Spanish is neither the "r" of English nor the "d" (nor, for that matter any other sound in English). If one absolutely must choose among English sounds, the "d" is more similar in its manner of articulation. A better course would be to listen to an actual Spanish speaker (e.g. the link that Nathaniel provided [although that speaker has the wimpiest final "a" that I've ever heard). For the sound of "r" in various phonetic contexts you could also try http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/#. Select "vibrantes" and then the "r" on the left and then the "arrow" in the right panel to hear several words with the "r" sound.

I like the site thanks!

¡Me gusto el sitio, gracias!

updated JUL 23, 2009
posted by Jason7R
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