bunch
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
bunch(
buhnch
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (collection of items)
a. el ramo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(flowers)
He picked a bunch of daisies in the field.Recogió un ramo de margaritas en el campo.
b. el ramillete
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(smaller)
She was wearing a bunch of flowers in her hair.Llevaba un ramillete de flores en el cabello.
c. el racimo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(bananas, grapes)
The emperor was reclining on a bear skin and eating a bunch of grapes.El emperador estaba tirado sobre una piel de oso y comía un racimo de uvas.
d. la penca
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(bananas)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The cart driver threw the bunch of bananas into his cart.El conductor echó la penca de plátanos a la carreta.
e. el manojo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(keys)
The janitor showed up with a bunch of keys to let us into the gym.El conserje apareció con un manojo de llaves para dejarnos entrar al gimnasio.
2. (group of people)
a. el grupo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A bunch of people were crowded around the entrance to the theater.Un grupo de personas estaba apiñado en la entrada del teatro.
b. la pandilla
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(friends)
Our bunch was always getting into mischief in the neighborhood.Nuestra pandilla siempre se metía en travesuras en el barrio.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(several)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el montón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I'd been to New York a bunch of times, but I had never lived here until now.Había visitado Nueva York un montón de veces, pero nunca había vivido aquí hasta ahora.
b. el bonche
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
There's a bunch of people in the street.Hay un bonche de gente en la calle.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
4. (to collect)
a. juntar
The clown bunched his props into a bag for the party.El payaso juntó sus accesorios en una bolsa para la fiesta.
b. amontonar
I bunched the kids in the car and drove off.Amontoné a los niños en el coche y partí.
bunches
A plural noun indicates that there is more than one person, place, thing, or idea.
plural noun
5. (hairdressing) (United Kingdom)
a. colitas
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Am I too grown-up to wear bunches?¿Estoy demasiado mayor para usar colitas?
b. las coletas
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
She was wearing a leather jacket and had her hair in bunches.Llevaba una chaqueta de piel y el pelo en coletas.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
bunch
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (of flowers)
a. el ramo m, ramillete
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
2. (of bananas, grapes)
a. el racimo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
3. (of keys)
a. el manojo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
4. (of friends)
a. la pandilla
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
5. (of people)
a. el grupo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
to wear one's hair in bunchespeinarse con or llevar coletas
to have a whole bunch of things to dotener un montón de cosas que hacer
the best or the pick of the bunchel mejor de todo el lote
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
bunch [bʌntʃ]
noun
1 [of flowers] ramo (m); (small) ramillete (m); [of bananas, grapes] racimo (m); [of keys] manojo (m)
to wear one's hair in bunches (Britain) llevar coletas; the best or pick of the bunch el/la mejor de todos
I watched every game of the World Cup and Craig was the pick of the bunch Though Nguyen submitted three excellent pictures, the one shown right was judged to be the pick of the bunch
2 (set of people) grupo (m); pandilla (f)
they're an odd bunch son gente rara; they're a bunch of traitors son una panda de traidores
the best of a bad bunch entre malos, los mejores
3 (US)
a bunch of (several, many) un montón de
We did a bunch of songs together I'd love to have a whole bunch of multi-racial kids
a bunch of times un montón de veces
4
thanks a bunch! ¡hombre, pues te lo agradezco!; ¡gracias mil!
Well, I'll look forward to my certificate. Barber: OK, buddy. Edwards: Thanks a bunch Whoever scheduled this popular film to end at 10pm on a schoolnight: thanks a bunch. "I've been island-hopping in the Pacific for the past two and a half years, free as a bird, but you've been on my mind." Well, thanks a bunch, Paul
transitive verb
[+objects] agrupar; juntar
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
Word Roots
Hover on a tile to learn new words with the same root.
Loading roots
Phrases with "bunch"
Here are the most popular phrases with "bunch." Click the phrases to see the full entry.
a bunch of
un montón de
Examplesloading
Learn Spanish with Fluencia
Try Fluencia, the new Spanish learning program from SpanishDict.
  • Fun and interactive
  • Highly effective
  • Easy to use
  • Works on any device
Start Learning
Did this page answer your question?