que

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Can someone show me all the different way that this "que" is used. For example I heard of something called the colloquial "que" before. I know qué means what and how in certain situations

2+2=5

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updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by ravensty

22 Answers

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Well that was going was going to say Lazarus! cool smile

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by eric_collins
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That is not the idea I'm trying to get across to you qfreed.

Thank you. After reading Lazarus' post on the other thread I understand what your point is. Sorry about not picking up on it sooner.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Que hable nosotros...let us speak=Let's speak; that's the form I was looking for on the other indirect command thread.= hablémonos

Robert is right here (or course): The direct object pronoun in "hablémonos" overlaps with the subject, so there are only two possible interpretations. The most probable one, pragmatically speaking, is the reciprocal one "let's talk to each other", but it could also have a reflexive interpretation: "Let's talk to ourselves".

Regarding the uses of "que", you might find it interesting to read a comment I posted a few minutes ago here: http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/show/9646/.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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That is not the idea I'm trying to get across to you qfreed.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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I think, 'Let him speak!' = ¡Déjelo/déjalo/déjenlo hablar! or !...déjenlo que hable!

Don't let the dog go out! = ¡No dejes que se salga el perro!.

Es decir, pienso que el 'que' va en la mitad. Have a good night.

See my response below.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin, technically I don't think that "que" can be translated as "let" in these examples because it is the way you are expressing the idea in Spanish. You don't have to exclude the verb "dejar" = (to let) from these sentences:

No dejes que ella escriba. or No la dejes escribir.

No lo dejes hacer eso. or No dejes (que el/ella) haga eso.

Déjalo hablar. or Déjalo que (el) hable.

[del]Que hable nosotros[/del]...let us speak=Let's speak; that's the form I was looking for on the other indirect command thread.= hablémonos

Let's speak = Hablemos

Let us speak = Déjennos hablar

What do you mean by "hablémonos"? Let's talk to each other''? It can also be "hablemos"

You can replace the verb dejar for permitir (to allow) in all of these examples. Try it.

With the exception of the last sentence all of the examples and the translations were taken directly from a grammar text. I know that you can use the 1st person plural in the subjunctive to also give the Let's.. indirect command. I also know that you can express the concept with dejar. I was just adding another example of how to use Que. (and that is to give an indirect command)

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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[del][/del][del][/del]

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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In this indirect command usage would you say that the Que is not translated or that it means Let?

Que no escriba ella.

Don't let her write.

Que haga él eso.

Let him do that.

Que hable él.

Let him speak.

Quentin, technically I don't think that "que" can be translated as "let" in these examples because it is the way you are expressing the idea in Spanish. You don't have to exclude the verb "dejar" = (to let) from these sentences:

No dejes que ella escriba. or No la dejes escribir.
No lo dejes hacer eso. or No dejes (que el/ella) haga eso.
Déjalo hablar. or Déjalo que (el) hable.

[del]Que hable nosotros[/del]...let us speak=Let's speak; that's the form I was looking for on the other indirect command thread.= hablémonos

Let's speak = Hablemos

Let us speak = Déjennos hablar

What do you mean by "hablémonos"? Let's talk to each other''? It can also be "hablemos"

You can replace the verb dejar for permitir (to allow) in all of these examples. Try it.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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What about the colloquial "que" that I heard Lazarus mention before

Sanity is not statistical

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by ravensty
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In this indirect command usage would you say that the Que is not translated or that it means Let?

Que no escribe ella.

Don't let her write.

Que haga él eso.

Let him do that.

Que hable él.

Let him speak.

Que hable nosotros...let us speak=Let's speak; that's the form I was looking for on the other indirect command thread.= hablémonos

I think, 'Let him speak!' = ¡Déjelo/déjalo/déjenlo hablar! or !...déjenlo que hable!

Don't let the dog go out! = ¡No dejes que se salga el perro!.

Es decir, pienso que el 'que' va en la mitad. Have a good night.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by Pablo_
0
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In this indirect command usage would you say that the Que is not translated or that it means Let?

Que no escribe ella.
Don't let her write.

Que haga él eso.
Let him do that.

Que hable él.
Let him speak.

Que hable nosotros...let us speak=Let's speak; that's the form I was looking for on the other indirect command thread.= hablémonos

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

A lo mejor le puedes cantar esta cancion.

Last night I didn't get to sleep at all
The sleeping pill I took was just a waste of time
I couldn't close my eyes 'cause you were on my mind

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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easy now Pablo...suave...OK OK maybe you can say:

"She is the woman of my dreams."

Well, I wouldn't necessarily say that. Let's suppose is just physical attraction, we don't what she is like inwardly. And sometimes we don't even have had a word with her. Thank you.

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by Pablo_
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easy now Pablo...suave...OK OK maybe you can say:
"She is the woman of my dreams."
"She is the one that keeps me awake at night." (My one year old). tongue laugh

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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Que also is used as a equivalent for 'who', e.g. That's the girl I told you.
Esa es la muchacha de la QUE te hablé = Esa es la muchacha de quien te hablé.
Esa es la mujer que me desvela (quita el sueño) (in a romantic sense, I'm getting interested in that woman more and more). BTW, please which would be the idiom in English for that saying'

updated JUN 26, 2009
posted by Pablo_
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