'...te oi decir mi nombre y luego te aceraste hasta mi?

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Hello,
I'm new to this forum and am not sure exactly where to post to get a little translation help. I'm trying to translate a song and am having a little trouble with the usual dictionary and on-line aids and was hoping someone here could help.

"...te oi decir mi nombre y luego te aceraste hasta mi"

Thank you for any help you can provide.

5364 views
updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by JackW

21 Answers

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I would suggest the translation machine, but they aint always exact

You not only typed "ain't" which I find terribly appalling but you didn't even put the apostrophe after the n. How shocking!!! Mr. Collins off to the dunce corner with you!!!

Raven is desperate for some company!

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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For starters you are missing a letter. It's supposed to be acercastes. "...y luego te acercastes a mi." ---| "I heard you say my name and later you came near me." I think that should be the correct way.

That's what I thought at first, as well, until I decided to look up "acerar," and then I took off in that direction. I guess I shouldn't have assumed that Jack was certain about "acerar" if I questioned his accuracy concerning "hasta."

"Acercarte" definitely makes more sense, but not with "hasta."

Are you familiar with the song? It doesn't really say "te acercastes," does it?

Thanks, Robert. I thought I might find you here at this hour.

Where have you been of late'

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

For starters you are missing a letter. It's supposed to be acercastes. "...y luego te acercastes a mi." ---| "I heard you say my name and later you came near me." I think that should be the correct way.

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
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This is one of those instances in which it is difficult to translate poetry/lyrics and have it sound "natural" and poetic still.

Are you sure it is not "... te aceraste hacia mí"? That would make better sense to me, but a native speaker may be able to help with this expression, especially if it is idiomatic or poetic.

"Hasta" usually means "as far as (a distance or point in time or space), (up) to, until."
"Hacia" means "toward(s)."
"Te aceraste" means "you turned into steel, you became as hard as steel." This is what makes it hard to "fit" into the rhythm of a song or poem, when you have one or two words that require a number of words to translate.

Assuming that the word is hacia, you have "... I heard you say my name and then you became as hard as steel toward me." A little less rigid translation would be "... then you hardened/became hard/cold toward me."

Now, another definition for "acerar" is "to pave, lay down pavement or a walkway." If you interpret it that way, "te aceraste hasta me" would, I guess, be something like, "you made your way to me" or "you made yourself a way to get to me." This idea is a stretch, but isn't that what music does sometimes?

HELP, Lazarus, Robert, Heidita!

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Thanks for the reply. Yes, I tried the machine translation and as you said, it wasn't quite right. In fact, I couldn't even glean a good meaning. How would I go about asking a sr. member or an admin. this question'

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by JackW
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I would suggest the translation machine, but they aint always exact, I've typed things in English before that I know in Spanish (just to see what they think it is) that don't come out right, If it has to be "perfecta" then I would suggest asking a Administrator, Sr. Member, or a Native.

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by eric_collins