Arturo, el jinete macho mexicano, se junta con amigos quienes

0
votes

Arturo, el jinete macho mexicano, se junta con amigos quienes
le admiran; sus compañeros son chavos de su edad, adolescentes.

Ellos hablan de las nenas y sus experíencias y planes para tener las;
el se ve muy bien; con manera de caminar airoso y su nítido sombrero.

La actitud macho de Arturo informa su poética demostración de afecto
y sus gestos prácticados ? los de un no-le-vale-madre joven reprobado,
aquellos que viven el momento sin importar los demás y sus opiniones.

La postura confiada que el expresa en cada gesto ensegura a ella;
ella se acerca a él, formando parte de él, y amando todo lo de él.

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Arturo, the Mexican macho rider, hangs out with with his buddies
who admire him; his companions are kids about his age, adolescents.

They talk a lot about chicks and their experíences and their plans
to get them; he looks good; with his jaunty gait and neat sombrero.

Arturo's macho attitude informs his poetic demonstration of affection
and his practiced gestures - that of a devil-may-care young reprobate
who only lives for the moment without a care about anyone's opinions.

The confident posture he expresses in every gesture assures her;
she moves closer, forming part of him, loving everything about him.

FRIENDS, SINCERELY THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP AND PARTICIPATION
IN THE CORRECTION AND IMPROVEMENT OF THIS EXPERIMENTAL NOVEL
WHETHER IN THE ENGLISH OR IN THE SPANISH LANGUAGE OR WHETHER
IN THE EFFECTIVE CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE PAIRED VERSES.

3522 views
updated MAY 31, 2009
posted by Martin-Rizzi

4 Answers

2
votes

Thank you very much. I was never very clear about the proper use of subjects to specificative clauses.

In English it is normal to say "The person who came...", but in Spanish you can't use "quien" here; you must use "que". There are few cases where you can't use "que", and even fewer cases where "quien" must be used, so whenever you hesitate, use "que"; it is statistically "safer".

I think "cojer" fits here. How about in Spain?

"Coger" is not used like that in Spain either, but in Mexico and other countries is almost a strong taboo sexual verb, so you better avoid it.

updated MAY 20, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
2
votes

Arturo, el jinete macho mexicano, se junta con amigos [del]quienes[/del] que le admiran

You can't use "quien" as a subject of a "specificative" relative clause.

[del]Ellos[/del] hablan de las nenas y sus experiencias y planes para [del]tener las[/del] tenerlas

Try to avoid personal pronouns. An infinitive, such as "tener", must have the pronoun (las) attached to it. The choice of verb (tener) is wrong in Spain, where we'd probably say "ligárselas" or something like that, but this is likely to be different depending on the country.

el se ve muy bien; con una manera de caminar airosa y su [del]nítido[/del] cuidado sombrero.

Nítido means "not blurred, sharp".

I'll check the rest later. I gotta go.

updated MAY 20, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

Arturo, el jinete macho mexicano, se junta con amigos [del]quienes[/del] que le admiran

You can't use "quien" as a subject of a "specificative" relative clause.

Thank you very much. I was never very clear about the proper use of subjects

to specificative clauses.

[del]Ellos[/del] hablan de las nenas y sus experiencias y planes para [del]tener las[/del] tenerlas

Try to avoid personal pronouns. An infinitive, such as "tener", must have the pronoun (las) attached to it. The choice of verb (tener) is wrong in Spain, where we'd probably say "ligárselas" or something like that, but this is likely to be different depending on the country.

I think "cojer" fits here. How about in Spain?

el se ve muy bien; con una manera de caminar airosa y su [del]nítido[/del] cuidado sombrero.

Nítido means "not blurred, sharp".

Yes; again, thank you for that - "cuidado sombrero"

I'll check the rest later. I gotta go.

updated ABR 5, 2011
posted by Martin-Rizzi
0
votes

Thank you very much. I was never very clear about the proper use of subjects to specificative clauses.

In English it is normal to say "The person who came...", but in Spanish you can't use "quien" here; you must use "que". There are few cases where you can't use "que", and even fewer cases where "quien" must be used, so whenever you hesitate, use "que"; it is statistically "safer".

I think "cojer" fits here. How about in Spain?

"Coger" is not used like that in Spain either, but in Mexico and other countries is almost a strong taboo sexual verb, so you better avoid it.

In Spain, the young bucks don't say "cojer las nenas"?

Yes, I did say that half as a joke. You are right "cojer" is too strong and crude a word.

It did occur to me how to say this, and it is as well a good typical Mexican expression

Hablan de las nenas y de sus experíencias y sus planes para llegarlas;
el se ve bien; con una manera de caminar airosa y su cuidado sombrero.

**They talk a lot about 'the babes? and their experíences and plans
to get them; he looks good; with his jaunty gait and neat sombrero.
**

¿Que tal? Se hablan de "llegar a las nenas" en el castillano del Pais Madre'

updated MAY 31, 2009
posted by Martin-Rizzi