Ir or Irme??

0
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When I used the sentence 'Tengo que ir' to tell that 'I have to go', I've been corrected that it should be 'Tengo que irme.'
Why is it so? I mean 'ir' is a verb which means 'to go'. And 'tengo que' means 'I have to'. Could you please explain?
Thank you smile

13006 views
updated MAY 23, 2009
posted by LikeALeprechaun

12 Answers

1
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When I used the sentence 'Tengo que ir' to tell that 'I have to go', I've been corrected that it should be 'Tengo que irme.'

Why is it so? I mean 'ir' is a verb which means 'to go'. And 'tengo que' means 'I have to'. Could you please explain?

"Ir" requires a destination (even though it is implicit), but the starting location is purely optional.
"Irse" implies leaving the starting location, but the destination is purely optional.

Think of them as different verbs.

If you say "Tengo que ir", your focus is on the destination, but you haven't even mentioned one. "You have to go to..." (silence) "to..." (more silence). The sentence is incomplete.

On the other hand, in "Tengo que irme", the focus is on the starting point, and no one expects any specific destination. You are just leaving the place, that's all (of course, you can optionally add a destination).

Saying simply "Voy", without a clear destination, is almost like saying "I require", and stop there. You require... what''? You can only say "Voy" if the destination has been previously established.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Heidi, "noob" is short for "newbie".. someone who is very new at something. His comment was self-deprecating.

updated MAY 23, 2009
posted by Valerie
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I'm a noob. smile

Jason, what is a noob? gulp

updated MAY 23, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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HI anne, I have moved your thread to the grammar category. I hope you understood Lazarus, if you have any more questions , please ask.

I think you said this on the chat and when you said: Tengo que ir....I or somebody else probably asked: where to?

Tengo que irme: I got to go.

updated MAY 23, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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When I used the sentence 'Tengo que ir' to tell that 'I have to go', I've been corrected that it should be 'Tengo que irme.'

Why is it so? I mean 'ir' is a verb which means 'to go'. And 'tengo que' means 'I have to'. Could you please explain?

Thank you smile

Ir - to go (to go where? somewhere, anywhere).
Tengo que ir a la escuela - I have to go to school.
Irse - to go away (I have to leave where I am now and go somewhere else, where? it doesn´t matter)
Tengo que irme - I have to leave
Me voy - I am going.
Does that make any sense'

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Eddy
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It was a comment that Jason made, not you, Anne. Have you read it? I apologize again for any misunderstanding.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Nancy-Gayed
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NO, because of "Not that it means much", I don't know, I thought it was funny, no offense.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Nancy-Gayed
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lol, that was funny.

What's funny'? I'm serious here.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by LikeALeprechaun
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lol, that was funny.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Nancy-Gayed
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Is it because you have to be reflexive when the action verb of the sentence is on the noun? I never really thought of "irme" before but "Tengo que irme" looks correct to me... not that, that means much,
I'm a noob. smile

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by jason4
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It's more of I have to let myself go, but if you were to say I have to go only, in spanish, it wouldn't make any sense, like you have to go where? That's why sometimes you can say me tengo que ir, or me voy.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Nancy-Gayed
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I have to go

Me tengo que ir
Tengo que irme

I have to go to school
Tengo que ir a la escuela and optionally Me tengo que ir a la escuela

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by AntMexico