how different is spoken English in the United States?

0
votes

En muchos programas norteamericanos de TV donde aparece gente de Texas, en el doblaje al español les ponen un acento "ranchero", ¿es así en el inglés? En México puede ser un poco difícil entenderse con gente de regiones distantes por diferencias en la pronunciación y vocabulario. ¿Cómo es esto en los Estados Unidos'

4383 views
updated ABR 21, 2009
posted by AntMexico

11 Answers

0
votes

El dialecto in EE.UU varia con partes diferentes, pero no es muy mal. Soy del norte pero vivo in el sur, y puedo entender bien. Accentos de Alabama, Tennesee, New York City, Boston, etc son mas fuertes, para razones diferentes. Pero solo es la jerga y frases comunes que son diferentes, la ingles esential es igual. Por ejemplo:

en New York: "PUSH the button"
en South Carolina: "MASH the button"
en NY: "Turn the light off"
en SC: "CUT the light off"

Bromamos aqui que "las nucharojas" (rednecks) tienen su propia lengua haha.

updated ABR 21, 2009
posted by Ashlita
0
votes

En muchos programas norteamericanos de TV donde aparece gente de Texas, en el doblaje al español les ponen un acento "ranchero", ¿es así en el inglés? En México puede ser un poco difícil entenderse con gente de regiones distantes por diferencias en la pronunciación y vocabulario. ¿Cómo es esto en los Estados Unidos?

sí sí tenemos acentos diversos en todas partes de EEUU. Unos de diferencia distintos son de Alabama, Texas, Tennesee, etc. No es mi intención ofenderle a nadie, pero la verdad, me río de janerio cuando yo escuche a los gente que hablen con esos acentos. A menudo, los acentos suenan muy raro y a veces no se puede adivinar de donde son. Sin embargo, nosotros no tenemos ningún problema de entendernos. Sabes que? el presidente Bush, se viene de Texas, tenía que aprender a hablar con un acento universal como el resto del país.

No dudes en corregirme. Trato de escribir en español.

updated ABR 10, 2009
posted by duy
0
votes

Sabes que?

Should that be ¿Sabes qué?

diferencias

escucho o escuché (or is that present subjunctive')

And as a fellow Texan I believe that you should be tied behind a horse and drug through cactus for talking about our ex-president that way and staining the honor

of all Texans! grin

Muchas gracias Qfreed por tu corrección. Se me olvidó de poner '¿' y deben ser 'qué' y 'diferencias' también. Lo usé el presente subjuntivo por allá pero no estoy seguro :( Necesito que me ayudes...

Y sobre el tema de Texas, es basado historia real, no estoy inventándola haha, lo hice solo en nombre de la diversión. Creo que es un cumplido de ser Texan y habla como Texan smile

updated ABR 10, 2009
posted by duy
0
votes

r "Raise that winder down!!"


I grew up in the South and Texas. My ex always told me that I could not say the word pen. It always came out as pin. And everything is winduh and pilluh. Both the Texan and Southern drawl seems to come and go. I lost them when I moved to Ohio, regained it when I lived in North Carolina, lost it when I returned to Ohio, regained it when I moved back to Texas. Lost it again when I returned to Ohio. You mimic the daily speech that you hear. I'm hoping that if I ever move to a Latin American country I can mimic the tempo of the Spanish language which always sounds fast to English speakers. I don't know where Hollywood got the slow drawl for Mexicans that they did on cartoons like Speedy Gonzalez and in some movies.

updated ABR 10, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Las diferencias de acentos me fascinan! Me gustan mucho. A veces es dificil para las personas entenderse pero es muy intersante escuchar a las diferencias

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by Debiera
0
votes

No olivides a mencionar el gente de "Boston, MA". Dicen "pohk thah cah in thah yod"y vez de "Park the car in the yard" y tambien "bubbler" en vez de "water fountain". Es muy defícil a comprender a veces. Yo tambien, soy un estudiante de español. por favor perdone mi errores.

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by jason4
0
votes

The Americans (native English speakers) I've had the most trouble understanding were kids from the back hills of Kentucky. It was so bad it was almost like they were speaking their own dialect. Also, when I first got to know some people from inner-city St. Louis, I had some trouble getting used to how they talked. It always jars me a bit to hear "Raise that winder down!!"

The 'movie' version of a Texas accent is probably a little exaggerated, but you have to remember what a large state Texas is. I lived in Dallas, TX for a while, and there wasn't much noticeable difference in accent from Missouri. However, a few words were different (freeway vs. Interstate, frontage road vs. service road).

One difference that did stand out: there was a recruiter in my employer's Dallas office from the East Coast. She spoke FAST! NOBODY in Texas speaks that fast!!

Again, that was in Dallas. Other parts of Texas are probably different.

I've been teased all my life for saying "waRsh" (wash) and "fEEsh" (fish) -- apparently I get this from my mom, who was a Nebraska farm girl.

The so-called "Southern accent" actually varies a great deal from state to state. An example of a person with a North Carolina accent would be evangelist Billy Graham. Georgia has a distinctive accent also -- former President Carter, of course, is from Georgia.

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

I've been teased all my life for saying "waRsh" (wash)

How funny ---| I always say "warsh" and get corrected. "Warshington" Ha Ha get it.

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by Daniel
0
votes

Sabes que?

Should that be ¿Sabes qué?

diferencias

escucho o escuché (or is that present subjunctive')

And as a fellow Texan I believe that you should be tied behind a horse and drug through cactus for talking about our ex-president that way and staining the honor of all Texans! grin

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Yes, we do have may regions with their own accents or quirky idioms, but the point to remember is that most English speakers can understand each other though we may find each other's speech humorous.
The larger roadblock in communications is that we are a true "melting pot" and that people with similar language and culture like to live together in the same community. So if you you visit certain regions or towns you might find it hard to communicate, not because of regional dialect, but because you don't speak French, Italian, Yiddish, Spanish, Vietnamese, Chinese, Russian, German or whatever non-English ethnic group that has settled there.
And not everyone agrees with the philosophy that if you live there you should learn the language.

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Hola Toni:

Sí, hay también diferencias en pronunciacion en algunas zonas de los EE. UU.. Además de Texas, algunos estados de los sureste y algunos estados que borde de las costa de este, ---| cada uno tienen sus propia y único pronunciaciones.

Lo siento por el mal español, sólo soy un principiante.

updated ABR 9, 2009
posted by Daniel