HomeQ&ANo te cases con alguien con quien puedas vivir cásate con la persona sin la cual no puedas vivir.

No te cases con alguien con quien puedas vivir cásate con la persona sin la cual no puedas vivir.

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*No te cases con alguien con quien puedas vivir cásate con la persona sin la cual no puedas vivir.
*
Good morning. Received this this morning as a quote of the day, and managed to translate it(with some difficulty). Is this not a run-on sentence in spanish. I couldn't figure it out until I put a period after vivir. Also, I'm wondering about cásate. I know it's imperative, but when I checked the conjugator to make sure, it's listed as casate(no tilde). Is it wrong in the quote or in the conjugator? I checked the WR conjugator for the same verb, but under imperativo presente, all forms are listed as no disponible.
Thanks

9440 views
updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by The-Steve

4 Answers

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That old song contains marriage advice that may be more practical. wink

If you want to be happy for the rest of your life
Never make a pretty woman your wife.
So from my personal point of view
Get an ugly girl to marry you.

Si quieres estar feliz por el resto de tu vida
Nunca te cases con una guapa.
Y desde el punto de vista mío
Cásate con una fea.

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Let's further explain for beginners. These two sentences show an example of how to form the familiar, imperative with the first conjugation. (singular forms only)

When forming the positive it's stem + 3rd person, singular (indicative) ending = cásate (cás+a+te)
but when negative (like in the first sentence) it is stem +2nd person, singular (present subjunctive) no te cases
No te (cas+es)

(the plurals are positive casados and negative no os caséis)

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Como siempre, gracias señor

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Without a stop of some sort after "vivir" is not just impossible to understand, but hard to read aloud - you run out of air before you reach the end.

The imperative "tú" form of "casarse" es "cásate" for standard Spanish, and "casate" for "voseo" countries, like Argentina. Most likely, the accent is missing by mistake.

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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