2nd person vs 3rd person are they interchangeble?

0
votes

Hi everyone! I am trying to understand the difference between the 3rd person and the 2nd person. It seems to me that they are interchangeable when you are having a direct conversion with someone. One is formal and other is informal?

For example:
Quiere monstrarme el problema'(formal')
vs
Quieres monstrarme el problema'(informal')

How about asking a girl to dance?

quieres bailar'(if I've met this girl before)
vs
quiere bailar'( if I've never met her before)

So when i talk to strangers, I should talk to them in 3rd person right?
Thank you for your help.

Duy

7702 views
updated NOV 22, 2008
posted by duy

23 Answers

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One more:Usted meand something like "your honour".now think! how are you going to ask someone something,adressing him "your honour"'"Does you honour like somethink to drink"'You see,even in english is 3-th person

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by Philip
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It dependssmileIn Spain here i never use to someone at my age,in informal situation.i meen on the street.Neither do it the people i meet.But when i adress older person,or the situation is kind of formal...i dont think asking a girl to dance is formal.but when you show espect to someone who you dont know and you want to be formal use Usted form.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by Philip
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duy said:

thanks everyone. Heidita, btw, I am still curious and just to be sure, let's say, I'd like to ask an elderly, my grandmother for instance, to dance with me, I should say quiere bailar? instead of quieres bailar?

My grandma would be a bit shocked if I used "usted" (a pronoun used in Spain to mark a clear and respectful line between two people with very little intimate in common) with her. My guess is that she'd guess that I am pretending to invite an unknown respectul lady for a dance, just to amuse her.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

thanks everyone. Heidita, btw, I am still curious and just to be sure, let's say, I'd like to ask an elderly, my grandmother for instance, to dance with me, I should say quiere bailar? instead of quieres bailar?

Duy

Heidita said:

I think duy was asking if we use the second or third person (polite form) indifferently.

The answer is: it depends on the country.

In Spain we more and more use the second person, even when talking to an elderly person. I personally find this rather impolite though. In other countries, the second person is seldom used and everybody says "usted" even if you are a close friend.

So, In Spain: i would recommend to use the third person if you don't' know this person, unless he/she is your age. Otherwise, use the second person.

It seems to me that they are interchangeable when you are having a direct conversion with someone. One is formal and other is informal'

Yes, this is true.

>

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by duy
0
votes

I think duy was asking if we use the second or third person (polite form) indifferently.

The answer is: it depends on the country.

In Spain we more and more use the second person, even when talking to an elderly person. I personally find this rather impolite though. In other countries, the second person is seldom used and everybody says "usted" even if you are a close friend.

So, In Spain: i would recommend to use the third person if you don't' know this person, unless he/she is your age. Otherwise, use the second person.

It seems to me that they are interchangeable when you are having a direct conversion with someone. One is formal and other is informal'

Yes, this is true.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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votes

Sorry for going on so if that wasn't your question. I still don't quite get it though. when you speak to someone you speak in the 2nd person. When you speak about someone you speak in the 3rd person. So all of your examples are 2nd person.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Yes, I know it but what I am trying to say is Spanish speakers like to talk in 3rd person when they refer to each other. And I am trying to find out if this is true.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by duy
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If you go to the conjugation tab at the top of the page, you can see charts for any verb showing the forms of the various tenses. The second line down in any one of those is second person familiar. The third line is the form for second person formal(usted) and thiird person. So you'll use the third peson form of the verb with usted, but I don't think it would be right to say that you are talking in third person. On the plural side of the chart, the second line down is the second person plural familiar in Spain. In the americas they don't use the plural familiar pronoun vosotros or its conjugation. Second person plural will be ustedes and the verb will be the same as the third person plural. Hopefully I got all that right.

updated NOV 17, 2008
posted by The-Steve