Any special reason why abrís would be used for OPEN in the Word of the Day?

1
vote

Anyone know why abrís would be chosen to mean open in the Word of the Day? I would have expected abierto, o abre, abrid, abraís, abra, abran but not the vosotros of the present indicative.

2582 views
updated OCT 13, 2011
posted by 0074b507

10 Answers

0
votes

Sorry about the word of the day. We are very aware of how terrible it can be (pero caliente, for example). I am currently working very hard on the new one and it should be coming out soon. I think you will all be very much relieved as it is of much higher quality. And yes, the reason there are strange words every now and then is because it is a random selection from the words in our old dictionary. So, just hang in there for a little longer and take the current word of the day with a grain of salt.

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Paralee
0
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It's not the verb conjugations that are confusing, but the pronouns. Sometimes you use vos and other times tu, te or tuyo.

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

(yo) canto(vos) cantás(él) canta(nosotros) cantamos(vosotros) cantáis(ellos) cantancantá (vos)Note: the imperative is always regular, and there are different types of "voseo", depending on the country and the region.

Guillermo said the other day: "Hacé tu vida."So is this the pattern'tú comes --Put an accent on the last syllable and it becomes-- *vos comés**¡Cómelo (tú)!* --Move the accent (now it doesn't need to be written) and we get-- *¡Comelo (vos)!*I don't need to use it . . . but it keeps getting posted up here, so it would be nice to recognize it. Is this right or close to right?

>

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Thanks!! Got it!

Quentin said:

http://www.voseospanish.com/conjugationChart.php

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

Quentin said:

Thank you for explaining the use of the voseo. I exchange letters with someone in Buenos Aires and they have practically replaced the tuteo with voseo and I don't know how to form it.

The "voseo" forms are actually quite regular, and therefore, not hard to use, but anyone in Argentina should be able to switch from "vos" to "tú" effortlessly, or, in any case, understand the "tú" conjugation perfectly.

Could you give us a link to a sample "voseo" conjugation? It comes up constantly on this forum & I never know how the verbs are being used.

>

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

(yo) canto (vos) cantás

(él) canta

(nosotros) cantamos

(vosotros) cantáis

(ellos) cantan

cantá (vos)

Note: the imperative is always regular, and there are different types of "voseo", depending on the country and the region.

Guillermo said the other day: "Hacé tu vida."

So is this the pattern?

tú comes --Put an accent on the last syllable and it becomes-- vos comés

¡Cómelo (tú)! --Move the accent (now it doesn't need to be written) and we get-- ¡Comelo (vos)!

I don't need to use it . . . but it keeps getting posted up here, so it would be nice to recognize it. Is this right or close to right'

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

(yo) canto
(vos) cantás
(él) canta
(nosotros) cantamos
(vosotros) cantáis
(ellos) cantan

cantá (vos)

Note: the imperative is always regular, and there are different types of "voseo", depending on the country and the region.

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

http://www.voseospanish.com/conjugationChart.php

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

Quentin said:

Thank you for explaining the use of the voseo. I exchange letters with someone in Buenos Aires and they have practically replaced the tuteo with voseo and I don't know how to form it.

The "voseo" forms are actually quite regular, and therefore, not hard to use, but anyone in Argentina should be able to switch from "vos" to "tú" effortlessly, or, in any case, understand the "tú" conjugation perfectly.

Could you give us a link to a sample "voseo" conjugation? It comes up constantly on this forum & I never know how the verbs are being used.

>

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Quentin said:

Thank you for explaining the use of the voseo. I exchange letters with someone in Buenos Aires and they have practically replaced the tuteo with voseo and I don't know how to form it.

The "voseo" forms are actually quite regular, and therefore, not hard to use, but anyone in Argentina should be able to switch from "vos" to "tú" effortlessly, or, in any case, understand the "tú" conjugation perfectly.

Could you give us a link to a sample "voseo" conjugation? It comes up constantly on this forum & I never know how the verbs are being used.

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Quentin said:

Thank you for explaining the use of the voseo. I exchange letters with someone in Buenos Aires and they have practically replaced the tuteo with voseo and I don't know how to form it.

The "voseo" forms are actually quite regular, and therefore, not hard to use, but anyone in Argentina should be able to switch from "vos" to "tú" effortlessly, or, in any case, understand the "tú" conjugation perfectly.

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Thank you for explaining the use of the voseo. I exchange letters with someone in Buenos Aires and they have practically replaced the tuteo with voseo and I don't know how to form it.

lazarus1907 said:

It seems like a rather random choice, if you ask me.vos abrís = you open (using "voseo")vosotros abrís = you guys openMy guess is that they have a list with a number or words, including all the conjugated forms of each verb, the computer picked a random one, which happened to be "abrís", and provided an equivalent. In other words, they are not providing "abrís" as a translation for "open", but "open" as a translation for "abrís".

>

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

It seems like a rather random choice, if you ask me.

vos abrís = you open (using "voseo")
vosotros abrís = you guys open

My guess is that they have a list with a number or words, including all the conjugated forms of each verb, the computer picked a random one, which happened to be "abrís", and provided an equivalent in English. In other words, they are not providing "abrís" as a translation for "open", but "open" as a translation for "abrís".

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by lazarus1907