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si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo hubiera llevado si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo habria llevado

0
votes

Does anyone know the difference between
si+ pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo+pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo
si+ pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo+condicional compuesto

ej.
si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo llevaria
and
si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo habria llevado

7269 views
updated ENE 28, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by sue2

16 Answers

1
vote

Sue said:

oh, okay, I don't know anything at all about grammar in english, but the point is, do you think that using pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo is essenitially the same as using condicional compuesto?

Yes, the meaning is the same. And the use varies regionally.

updated ENE 28, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Hi, My name is Fe María de Varona and I am a Spanish teacher with a Masters degree. Hubiera and hubiese are the same and can be use interchangeably. Hubiese is the literary form as stated above, but it is used in speech in some areas and not necessarily haughty or affected (it depends on the area). Hubiera is the most common form used by the majority of Spanish speakers, especially in Latin America.

With sentences with if clauses it is perfectly acceptable to put the pluperfect subjunctive with the if clause and also in the independent clause.

Si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo hubiera llevado

The above sentence is acceptable today but in strict grammar books the conditional perfect is encouraged in the independent clause (the part of the sentence without the si)

Si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo habría llevado.

updated ENE 27, 2010
posted by femaria
0
votes

Have to disagree with sargebto chi - hubiera is exactly the same as hubiese. My teacher who is Spanish said so. Its just that hubiera is used more often than hubiese. in some spansih speaking countries people use hubiese if they want their sentences to be a little more impressive and use when writing to someone superior or to make the sentence more refined. In some places people who use hubiese are thought of as being arrogant and snooty

updated OCT 21, 2009
posted by miss-ind
0
votes

Natasha is correct."Hubiese" is considered to be just a literary form and not used in oral discourse. "Hubiera" is both a literary form and oral form.

Natasha said:

Sargento Chinicuil said:

The right way in spanish is:si hubiese terminado ayer, te lo habrìa llevado. That's the only correct way to say it. Hubiera doesn't apply at all.

Not according to previous discussions here . . . put "hubiese" in the "Search Forum" box & you'll see.

>

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by ltigo
0
votes

Sargento Chinicuil said:

The right way in spanish is:

si hubiese terminado ayer, te lo habrìa llevado. That's the only correct way to say it. Hubiera doesn't apply at all.

Not according to previous discussions here . . . put "hubiese" in the "Search Forum" box & you'll see.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Sargento Chinicuil said:

The right way in spanish is: si hubiese terminado ayer, te lo habrìa llevado. That's the only correct way to say it. Hubiera doesn't apply at all.

"Hubiera" can perfectly be used instead of "habría". People use it, and even the most conservative grammars accept its use as correct standard Spanish.

Sue said:

oh, okay, I don't know anything at all about grammar in english, but the point is, do you think that using pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo is essenitially the same as using condicional compuesto?

Only for these "si" type of sentences.

Quentin said:

You're changing horses midstream again. Now you're comparing the conditional to the conditional perfect. What happened to comparing the condicional perfect to the subjunctive pluperfect?

And No, they don't look right to me.

Sue said:

Thanks heaps for that. What I got out of that is that they are the same basically. I think the equivalent in english might beI would have come, if I had known (condicional compuesto)I would have come, if I knew (condicional)Do you think this is correct?

The imperfect and pluperfect subjunctive forms with in -ra have changed a lot in the last millennium. Initially they were indicative forms, so nowadays they have several different uses.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

If you had just said that up front you would have saved us a lot of research and squabbling>hehe
Thank you.

Heidita said:

Sue said:

oh, okay, I don't know anything at all about grammar in english, but the point is, do you think that using pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo is essenitially the same as using condicional compuesto?

Yes, the meaning is the same. And the use varies regionally.

>

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

oh, okay, I don't know anything at all about grammar in english, but the point is, do you think that using pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo is essenitially the same as using condicional compuesto'

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by sue2
0
votes

You're changing horses midstream again. Now you're comparing the conditional to the conditional perfect.
What happened to comparing the condicional perfect to the subjunctive pluperfect?

And No, they don't look right to me.

Sue said:

Thanks heaps for that. What I got out of that is that they are the same basically. I think the equivalent in english might beI would have come, if I had known (condicional compuesto)I would have come, if I knew (condicional)Do you think this is correct?

>

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Thanks heaps for that. What I got out of that is that they are the same basically. I think the equivalent in english might be

I would have come, if I had known (condicional compuesto)
I would have come, if I knew (condicional)

Do you think this is correct'

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by sue2
0
votes

http://eljuego.free.fr/Fichas_gramatica/FG_pluscuamperfecto_subjunt...

Make sure you look at this part:
El pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo también se utiliza a menudo en lugar del condicional compuesto en las estructuras de condicional.
Ejs.:
Si hubiera sabido que veníais, hubiera limpiado (o habría limpiado) un poco la casa.
Si el coche no se hubiese averiado, os lo hubiésemos podido (o habríamos podido) prestar.
Si hubiéramos participado en el concurso, estoy seguro de que hubiéramos ganado (o habríamos ganado).
Si hubiese sido más joven, hubiese venido (o habría venido) con vosotros a ese viaje alrededor del mundo.

(Ver las estructuras del condicional: condición "probable" o "irreal" y las estructuras del condicional: condición "imposible")

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes
updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Really? I copied this straight out of my textbook (it doen't explain the differences though). Maybe they're the same'

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by sue2
0
votes

The right way in spanish is:

si hubiese terminado ayer, te lo habrìa llevado. That's the only correct way to say it. Hubiera doesn't apply at all.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Sargento-Chinicuil
0
votes

yeah, you're right, sorry, I mean

si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo hubiera llevado
si hubiera terminado ayer, te lo habria llevado

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by sue2
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