Si fui de dejarle vs Si le dejara vs Si yo fuera a dejar a usted vs Si yo fuera a dejar a usted vs Si te dejara,

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If (ever) I would leave you, it wouldn't be in summer....

Machine Translation:
Babel Fish English/Spanish Translation:
Systran:
Google English/Spanish Translation

Do these different translations all mean the same thing'

3004 views
updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Lyndelle

13 Answers

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This is my problem, I wrote si yo fuera a dejarte earlier in the post but leave out the a later on. Confundo la vel'''''''''''? hehehe

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Ouch! I've been hammered enough about "was" (wink)

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Ha dicho la joya: NADA!!!

possibly a little more doubt in si fuera a dejarte.

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Si yo fuera dejarte
This has to be "Si yo fuera a dejarte. It means "If I were going to leave you." Note that many native English speakers would incorrectly write this as "If I was going to leave you."

Si te dejara
If I left you

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Heidita or James - Then what is the difference between the following

Si yo fuera dejarte

Si te dejara

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I cannot believe it, but I already know. One of the first sentences I learnt regarding the past subjunctive was followed by the conditional, "si mi hermano tuviese vacciones en la misma época que yo, iríamos a Madrid.

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Actually, including the "ever" I would have said:

Si alguna vez te dejara, nunca sería en verano.

bueno, en España es al revés, la mayoría de los divorcios y separaciones....¡¡¡en verano!!

Sois los hombres¡¡¡¡ inaguantables !! jeje

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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(I know I'm not H, but...)

They both mean "If I left you" or "If I were to leave you." This is the basic use of the past subjunctive.

If I had a million dollars...
Si tuviera un millon de dólares...

If I were president...
Si yo fuera el presidente...

This is how we express an untrue hypothesis in both Spanish and English. If the hypothesis is not untrue, we use the indicative.

If we go to the party, we'll have fun.
Si vamos a la fiesta, nos divertiremos.

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Heidita
Why would you use the past subjunctive, and what is the meaning in English of the two you have quoted.

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Thanks, Eddy. ¡Nunca te dejaré!

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Lyndelle
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Si yo fuera a dejarte

perfect.!!

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Si le dejara
Si te dejara

These two are the best .
Si yo LE fuera a dejar a usted: this one could only be possible with the included pronoun

Si fui de dejarle : incorrect

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I think the following are incorrect because a doubt is introduced by the word "si" which would demand the subjunctive.
Si fui de dejarle
Si le dejara
Si te dejara

The following might be correct but as we are talking about someone close, I doubt we would be using usted.
Si yo fuera a dejar a usted

I would guess at

Si yo fuera a dejarte

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by Eddy