need help translating

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Can you translate from english to spanish - "I missed you" thank you!

1563 views
updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by Lorien-Moore

10 Answers

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Hi Sam, welcome to the forum!

And Loraine, both lazarus and Sam are quite right!

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Hi Lorien, I have deleted Mami's reply, it was mistaken.

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Read this before posting a new discussion, please:
[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947[/url]

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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It is not a slang in Spanish or English, and "You errar vosotros" is not Spanish. Don't use it!

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I missed you is = Yo errar vosotros. and Thank You is = gracias.

"Yo errar vosotros" is grammatically wrong, and it would mean "I myself to err you".

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Listen to Lazarus,

If you are with the person now then its te extrane..(sorry lazarus about accents I dont have them and ctrl+'+ e doesnt work)

if you want to say I've missed you then te he extranado
or I missed you and I still do miss you is te extranaba.

yo errar vosotros is just wrong on so many levels.

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by Sam
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I am trying to convey to someone that it has been a long time since I've seen you - is there a slang term or is- Yo errar vosotros - it'

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by Lorien-Moore
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I am trying to convey to someone that it has been a long time since I've seen you - is there a slang term or is- Yo errar vosotros - it'

updated JUL 16, 2008
posted by Lorien-Moore
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I'm curious about trying to translate idioms in one language to another language. If you stop and think about it, the meaning of "I missed you", could mean that your aim was off and you will reload and try again. The words don't convey any emotional sense of loss or longing, except in a cultural sense.
"I felt a longing and emptiness in my heart because you were not there", expresses the idea behind the idiom "I missed you", but it is somewhat longer to write.

updated JUL 15, 2008
posted by jim4
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We get this question a few times a week:

Mostly in Latin America: Te extrañé.
In Spain and a few other countries: Te eché de menos.

However, depending on the context I might have to change the Spanish tenses to convey the same meaning (Te extrañaba / Te he extrañado / Te echaba de menos / Te he echado de menos).

updated JUL 15, 2008
posted by lazarus1907