Harry desenvolvió su de rena de chocholate y sacó la lámina.

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I'm having trouble interpreting this. Can someone shed some light on the situation?

Thanks

P.S.
I'm reading Harry Potter y la piedra filosofal.

2318 views
updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Lee-Allen

6 Answers

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In my copy it was written:
«Harry desenvolvió su rana de chocolate y sacó la lámina.»

Criss explains all, although a previous sentence does help a little:
«...Las ranas de chocolate llevan láminas, ya sabes, para coleccionar, de brujas y magos famosos. Yo tengo como quinientos....»

Good luck with the rest, I started my Spanish reading with HP -and finished no.7 a couple of months back. Having seen the first five films and knowing the characters and general plot already, helped when I didn't want to look up too many words.

updated JUL 21, 2008
posted by tad
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They probably do refer to the same kind of thing.

updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Criss
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Hello, maybe "lamina" is the same that "estampa". For example: in Spain children buy "estampas" for the 2008 football players album.

updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Barrilito
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"Lámina" most of the time is a sheet of metal, but we also used to to refer to the collectible-baseball-card-type things we'd get as kids (in Chile), that you'd buy in packs (of 4-6 cards) and paste into your album - each card/image had its assigned spot, so you had to collect all of them and trade with your friends. I don't think they have anything like that (other than baseball cards, but the ones we had were all sorts of cartoon characters) here in the US.

Which is probably a good thing, for me... I'd still buy them!

smile Criss.

updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Criss
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Thanks for the reply.

I was mostly having trouble with the translation of lámina. The dictionary says metal sheet or engraving etc. It didn't make sense to me.

Now it does.

Yeah, your right I should get the english version too. I guess I'm too stubborn.

lol

updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Lee-Allen
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"Harry unwrapped his chocolate [frog, if I remember the Hogsmeade candies correctly; "rana" is frog, so I don't know if that was a typo or they changed the type of candy in the translation or made up a word] and took out the [sheet/card/sticker - again, if I remember the lore correctly, the chocolate frogs come with "cards" of famous wizards, kind of like bubble gum baseball cards, which kids trade and collect]."

I'm reading the same book in French, but have the original English with me. When I finish a section in French, I re-read it in English (I read it the first time quite some time ago, so even though I know the basic storyline and events, I'm fuzzy on details), so I can check my understanding and decode unknown or confusing words. You might want to try that as well, that way you don't have to log on to the site and wait for an answer before knowing what happens! (Also, the HP books will have lots of made-up words, for the magical creatures, etc., so the best source for those translations will be the book itself in a language you know.)

updated JUL 20, 2008
posted by Criss