HomeQ&Atranslate plezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!!!!!!!!

translate plezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Dime con quién andas, y te diré quién eres

5219 views
updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by jessi

9 Answers

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i agree so pleez explain

updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by jessi
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Carlos, I agree with mantud. I like explanations in depth. Some of it is bound to click. So please keep it up.

updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by motley
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Tell me who your friends are, and I'll tell you who you are

Great question. We discussed this phrase a lot while studying Cervantes smile
ME

updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by Mary-Elena
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Who ever told you that is wrong. I love that you take the time to expain everything and your answers are always helpful. So, keep it up!
PS: plezzzzz'! Don't even get me started =)

updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by manutd
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¡Vaya! ¡Gracias! But it has been pointed out to me that my answers tend to be too exhaustive and exhausting, sometimes difficul to understand. I'll try to keep them simple, but you know, I'm a teacher and I like to teach.

Carlos Cayetano

updated ENE 13, 2008
posted by Cayetano-A-Arags
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No te preocupes. No problem, I wouldn't normally presume to be able to translate something like that, but the plezzzzz thing seemed so urgent and I was somewhat excited about finding the saying in the dictionary.

By the way I like your answers to questions that are posed. You do a good job.

updated ENE 12, 2008
posted by Mark-Burcham
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Sorry Mark, I hadn't seen your answer, which is fine.

updated ENE 12, 2008
posted by Cayetano-A-Arags
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It is a well-known proverb (refrán). Proverbs have equivalents in different languages, so translating them literally makes them lose power. The equivalent English proverb would be "Birds of a feather flock together". The literal translation is "Tell me who you hang around with and I will tell you who you are". The birds-of-a-feather version is, as you can see, much more to the point.

Another refrán with a similar meaning is "Dios los cría y ellos se juntan".

Hope it helps

updated ENE 12, 2008
posted by Cayetano-A-Arags
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I saw this phrase by accident while looking up one of the words in the spanish online dictionary. Apparently it translates to English as:

You can judge a man by the company he keeps. Or
Birds of a feather flock together.

Or other such sayings.

updated ENE 12, 2008
posted by Mark-Burcham
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