HomeQ&Ataza v.s. vaso

taza v.s. vaso

3
votes

Taza and vaso have the same meaning . I wonder if i can say una taza de leche instead of un vaso de leche

12362 views
updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by collectingit

6 Answers

1
vote

As far as I can tell, the distinction in Spanish is the same as it is in English. I would be surprised if someone were to offer me a "cup of wine/scotch" and, equally if the offer were for a "glass of coffee/tea" (unless iced).

In European cultures, i would expect a "cup" to have a handle and that a "glass" would not. If I were in China/Japan and it were a cup of tea, I would not expect a handle (but that's a different story).

updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by samdie
Great explanation samdie :) - Jason7R, JUL 12, 2010
2
votes

Similar but not exactly the same. "Taza" is a cup. "Vaso" is a glass.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
2
votes

My quick read of the definitions is that taza means cup and vaso is a glass. It looks like you can say eiither thing and be correct but there is a difference.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by nizhoni1
1
vote

Taza ...... Cup

Vaso ....... Glass

Tasa ..... Rate

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by 005faa61
0
votes

If it has a handle, it's a cup (taza) and not a glass (vazo). That nugget of wisdom from my Dominican friend tongue wink

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien
muy bien! - margaretbl, JUL 12, 2010
0
votes

Y no debemos olvidar que siempre es 'una copa de vino'. Don't forget that for wine it is a special glass and don't double click 'copa' it will say 'cup' and that (as a drinker of Spanish wine) I can tell you is l00% inaccurate! (That's the first time on this site I have dared to say that).

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by margaretbl
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