HomeQ&Awould "bay" at the of a communication mean her name or soething like bye

would "bay" at the of a communication mean her name or soething like bye

1
vote

see above

1341 views
updated JUL 10, 2010
posted by kyleandy
Please use proper/correct spelling grammer and punctuation on this site as people are learning English from your writing - FELIZ77, JUL 10, 2010
eg a question mark at the end of your question would help lol - FELIZ77, JUL 10, 2010

5 Answers

3
votes

Would "bay" at the end of a communication mean her name or something like 'bye'

Birdland - I can get this one - haha, I have a dear Mexican friend who emails me in Spanish and she ends all her communications with 'bay' and I know that she means 'bye'. (And actually sometimes she writes something like 'bayee' which I also think is 'bye-eeee' (Think Paris Hilton,etc.)

updated JUL 10, 2010
posted by margaretbl
Hey that's really amusing, I'm showing myself up as an ignorant Brit here!! I reckon you are right. - lagartijaverde, JUL 10, 2010
Hardly!! And I loved your word pictures of the baying in parliament, you should see ours this last session was especially bad, howling and baying, truly! - margaretbl, JUL 10, 2010
Where are you based Margaret? :-) - lagartijaverde, JUL 10, 2010
Hola Bird, I am in good old Vancouver, BC waaay out here on the west coast and in an awful time zone to be able to communicate properly!! - margaretbl, JUL 10, 2010
Thanks, you're right, we're in drifting time...which is a good place to be, good to know you :-) - lagartijaverde, JUL 10, 2010
1
vote

It works for me, sorry. The "globish" thing is the latest academic fad related to "globalisation" which is, as always, a way to redescribe the world in yet another dissertation.

The idea, which obviously has some significance, is that as international business increases, a kind of "business English" evolves even if the participants are not themselves English speakers.

It was called "pidgen" in the long gone days of the Empire but it's being resuscitated in a new and interesting way, (theoretically) by Linguists anxious to write a PhD now.

In it's latest manifestation we have the contemporary sobriquet "Globish"

The background is that (pidgen) copied the Chinese word for "business" which gives an interesting contemporary twist to the "great game". It was the Victorian name for "Globish"

Funny old world innit grin

updated JUL 10, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
Very interesting, and very contemporary as well, even when I lived in Europe 20 odd years ago I noticed that all that execs who wandered from country to country had their 'own' way of speaking. - margaretbl, JUL 10, 2010
1
vote

By the way, check out "Globish"

sorry about the uninformed piffle

updated JUL 10, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
shoot, I tried to click Globish but the silly thing froze!! rats. - margaretbl, JUL 10, 2010
1
vote

I don't understand this question but to "bay" is to shout, make a row, like the dreadful noise in British Parliament, which is just an awful contentious and pointless racket.

When wolves howl, they "bay". This phrase is somewhat antiquated now and may not be what you are after. Hope it helps

updated JUL 10, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
I agree. I've seen it used as a variation of good-bye. Not correct , of course, but its use comes from the similiar pronunciations. - 0074b507, JUL 10, 2010
Birdland I agree that this question has been badly phrased and didnt make sense to me until I read Margaret' Bl's response above - FELIZ77, JUL 10, 2010
0
votes

Yes that's a "potted" summation that I made there because people may not have focused their attention on it.

It seems that now there are "theoreticians" who, as you point out, some 20 years later, finally identify a phenomenon which is so natural to language that it is remarked upon in Suetonius and Tacitus, for example. The Romans were very alert to this sort of thing and for the same reasons, it echoed the changes and redefined perception of the Empire/StatusQuo.

I must not bore the **** off everyone about this stuff but what we are discussing can be summed up in the phrase lingua franca... and there are the pidgins and creoles

Perhaps I should stop now.

Vamos a hablar en Castellano, quizas en Catalan y, porque no, un poco de Galego, y tambien metes el ojo ....Andaluz grin

updated JUL 10, 2010
posted by lagartijaverde
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