HomeQ&ANo estés asustado / No temas / No tengas miedo

No estés asustado / No temas / No tengas miedo

0
votes

These are all exactly the same right? I would use the first "no estés asustado" but verbs that include the "to be" in the non infinitive form bug me anyway. ¿Que creen?

5121 views
updated JUN 30, 2010
posted by jeezzle

3 Answers

3
votes

I would never use "no estés asustado". "No temas" or "no tengas miedo" are the common ways to say: "don't be afraid".

updated JUL 1, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
2
votes

I agree with Gekkosan I would use:

**No tengas miedo = Don't be afraid (especially when speaking to a child ! )

o No temas**

in addition I might possibly add: no te preocupes (don't worry)

I would not use: No estés asustado this construction does not sound natural and hardly rolls off the tongue ! lol

updated JUL 1, 2010
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
Scooby dooby doo. - jeezzle, JUN 30, 2010
lol so where is my Scooby snack? hahaha - FELIZ77, JUN 30, 2010
0
votes

Hmm. I guess I love the word asustar and asustado and don't much like temer and temeroso. What if I said "No te asustes". It's wierd that asustar means "to scare" and you have to go pronomial to get "to be scared/get scared" and temer just means "to be fearful" and never "to cause fear". Gracias.

updated JUN 30, 2010
posted by jeezzle
You can say "causar temor" for "to cause fear". "No te asustes" is fine, too. - Gekkosan, JUN 30, 2010
To me "asustar" sounds like "to startle", but I know that's not completely correct. It is the only one of these verbs that can mean that, however. - CalvoViejo, JUN 30, 2010
I translate "to startle" as "sobresaltar". - Gekkosan, JUN 30, 2010
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