What would this read as,"no esa Roza ya esta podrida" In a way that makes sense?

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"no esa Roza ya esta podrida" Ive tried many different online translations and none of them made sense.

1595 views
updated MAY 19, 2010
posted by zadatron

5 Answers

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"No --- that rose is already wilted/dead/rotten/putrid"

Yes, I'm assuming that "Roza" is actually "rosa".

updated MAY 19, 2010
posted by geofc
Roza is actually a name of my friend
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Esa rosa ya esta podrida. That rose is bad.

updated MAY 19, 2010
posted by Rey_Mysterio
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or ... not that Rosa, she's rotten!

(hopefully not as that'd be mean and I'm sure she's not rotten at all smile)

updated MAY 19, 2010
edited by Kiwi-Girl
posted by Kiwi-Girl
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"no esa Roza ya esta podrida" Maybe what Geof said or with a comma - for example: No, Rosa. Ya está podrida. No Rose, that's already rotten (spoiled). Maybe looking at food?

updated MAY 19, 2010
edited by margaretbl
posted by margaretbl
Im thinkiing that they were talking about my friend being ugly or gross
Well that is a possibility, they were making a play on words, as if it was a flower gone bad. Mean, I think.
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Can you give some context, also did you listen to this (hear it) and wrote down what you heard, or...? Could Roza be the name Rosa?

updated MAY 19, 2010
posted by margaretbl
Uh yes somebody wrote this about my friend 'Roza'