HomeQ&AWhat is the Spanish equivalent of a pronomial pronoun?

What is the Spanish equivalent of a pronomial pronoun?

4
votes

A pronomial pronoun in English shows posession ? and what is its equivalent called in Spanish?

2681 views
updated MAY 16, 2010
edited by viajero
posted by viajero

5 Answers

5
votes

The word is a cognate and is spelled the same in English and in Spanish: pronominal

While I understand what you are asking, strictly speaking, the term "pronominal pronoun" is a bit of a misnomer when you consider that the term would literally mean "a pronoun that takes a pronoun." Of course that's not to say that you will not find this term thrown around even by certain "grammar" sites. A more appropriate term would be "pronominal verb" as it is the verb that is accompanied by the pronoun. In this case, the pronoun is an atonic pronoun which matches (in terms of person and number) with the verb's subject.

Here is an explanation by the RAE that you might find interesting:

verbo pronominal m. Gram. El que se construye en todas sus formas con un pronombre átono que concuerda con el sujeto y que no desempeña ninguna función sintáctica oracional. Algunos verbos son exclusivamente pronominales, como arrepentirse, y otros adoptan determinados matices significativos o expresivos en las formas reflexivas; p. ej., caer o morir.

On the other hand if you are referring to pronouns that show possession (mine, his, yours, theirs) these are simply referred to as possessive pronouns. If this is what you are referring to, then you might find the following discussions useful:

Pronombres Posesivos (in Spanish)

Possessive Pronouns (in English)

updated MAY 16, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
Thank you very much miss Izanoni 1 this is very helpful. - viajero, MAY 16, 2010
Certainly (not "miss" by the way) - Izanoni1, MAY 16, 2010
Señor Iaznoni, where did you get the links that you put in this post? They are great, and I'd like to pass the site on to some students. :-) - Delores--Lindsey, MAY 16, 2010
miss Izanoni 1-----::rolling on the floor::: - 00494d19, MAY 16, 2010
3
votes

Help me to help you. I need to know if you are looking only for a Spanish word for pronomial or are you looking for actual pronouns? If it is the pronouns that you seek, are you looking for possessive pronouns or reflexive pronouns. ( My hands vs. I wash my hands)

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by LateToDinner
2
votes

pronomial pronoun

There's no such thing (or, better yet, no such designation). All pronouns are (by definition pronominal). We also do not speak of "verbal verbs", "nominal nouns", adjectival adjectives or "adverbial adverbs".

With regard to pronouns, one may speak of "subject pronouns", "object pronouns", "indirect object pronouns" and "possessive pronouns".

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by samdie
what about reflexive pronouns, which is what is being discussed? relative pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, etc. - 0074b507, MAY 16, 2010
2
votes

Yes, miy friend Late to Diner, I would like to know how to translate the word, "promonial into Spanish" in other words what is the pronoun promonial in Spanish. thank you for your help. It is really apreciated.

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by viajero
That's what I thought, but I didn't want another badge for being a wiseguy with just the one word answer: pronomial (same word!) - LateToDinner, MAY 16, 2010
"pronominal" not "pronomial" or "promonial" :) - Izanoni1, MAY 16, 2010
1
vote

If you aren't familiar with the movie "Airplane" skip the italicized portion of the next sentence. Pronominal, as "and don't call me surely" Izanoni1 correctly spells it, is not the pronoun but the verb. The pronominal verb calls for a reflexive pronoun. Hence my request for a clarification of the original question which was really only for a translation of the word pronominal. But because it was mispelled, he wasn't getting a suitable answer. But we had some fun, didn't we?

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by LateToDinner
Oh my goodness, are you saying he didn't say "Don't call me "Shirley"? All these years.... - margaretbl, MAY 16, 2010
He absolutely was, but it was in response to his supposed misunderstanding of the others person's use of surely and all of that had nothing to do with the post addressed to "miss" - LateToDinner, MAY 16, 2010
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