Pensamientos - Thoughts (20):Los muchachos ni siquiera necesitábamos ver a una mujer ....

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The sentences I am going to post are by my one and only José Luis Alvitekiss, as sarcastic and ironic as usualwink Instead of posting this a killer thread, I thought I might post one sentence every other day or so.

I would like you to post the translation and your opinion about the sentence. I will correct the translation, and if you post an opinion in Spanish correct major grammar mistakes. You can post in English, but let's get a lot of opinions on these controversial sentences. wink

And remember:

Alvite is sarcastic, always pessimistic, nothing is what it looks likeraspberry

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Here goes number 20.

Delicate this time, background story, in Spain in schools leaflets are given out to "teach" sex to children, as young as 7 years old.

This sentence is about Alvite telling us what they used to do when he was young and that they did not need any "instructions"wink

I love the phrase about the wind...so delicate. smile

Los muchachos ni siquiera necesitábamos ver a una mujer desnuda para que nos hirviese la sangre. Nos bastaba con pasar por delante de la mercería y aspirar el delicado aroma de las puntillas. O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

3522 views
updated MAY 12, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by 00494d19
Very true. :)

12 Answers

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As boys we did not even need to see the woman undress to make our blood boil. It was enough to just breath in the delicate aroma of the lace as we passed in front of the haberdashery, or to see how her feminine clothing rippled in the wind.

This will probably get me right into the dunce corner. I know it's way off as far as translation goes but it is what I got from it and my blood is boiling.

I'm all for teaching kids that young but not in the school, that is a parenting thing.

Debemos enseñar a los niños de esa edad pero no en la escuela, eso es una labor de los padres.

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by Yeser007
this is beautiful yesero...I am sorry to see you leave the dunce corner:) and this is as close as one get get, very nice:)
oh...y di algo en español, algún comentario
Thanks, but not to worry, I'm sure I'll be back. :)
Gracias maestra.
So is "herniada" used here for "rippled"?
no because it is not translated word for word, it is my thought of what the author is trying to convey.
I think I'd change "exhausted" in my translation to "rippled"....good word...
what a nice word: haberdashery, beautiful!
Congratulations Yesero!
Thank you everyone. I liked haberdashery myself, it's kind of nostalgic. I had to look that up because I thought a haberdashery was an old fashioned hat shop.
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If it's ok to chime in here--I just want to say that I'm not at a level to translate this, but I truly appreciate this type of post. I really want to learn to read Spanish as well as speak it. This is very useful, as I can try and translate it, then read others' responses. I struggle with word order, so this type of post is educational on that topic as well. You can learn one hundred rules, but actually working with the language is so much more meaningful.

I'm working on the preterit and imperfect and so the use of bastaba from bastar is great to see in context.

And finally, as a literature nerd, I love this stuff.

Gracias.

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by Aamos
It is definately OK to chime in. Welcome!
you are very welcome, aamos, welcome to my threads:)
Bien! Continuar, por favor!
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Los muchachos ni siquiera necesitábamos ver a una mujer desnuda para que nos hirviese la sangre. Nos bastaba con pasar por delante de la mercería y aspirar el delicado aroma de las puntillas. O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

We young fellows (boys) didn't even need to see a naked woman to make our blood boil. It was enough just to pass by the clothing store and breathe the delicate scent of the lace. Or stop and notice how the feminine gusts of wind moved the women's clothing on the racks. (Yikes!)

Sí, los niños desde muy jóven saben bastante pero creo que es bueno enseñarles todo lo que se pueda en casa primero.

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by margaretbl
¡Este es la verdad! :)
gust of wind, beautiful
very nice translation, margerit, great
Since "hervir" is used as a transitive verb, you would say " . . . SE nos hirviese la sangre." Otherwise, good translation.
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Los muchachos ni siquiera necesitábamos ver a una mujer desnuda para que nos hirviese la sangre. Nos bastaba con pasar por delante de la mercería y aspirar el delicado aroma de las puntillas. O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

As boys we didn't even need to see a naked woman to get all hot and bothered. It was enough for us to go by the clothing store and breath in the delicate aroma of the lace. Or stand there to look at how the women's clothing moved on the racks, the exhausted women of the wind.

Pues, me parece interesante que, en mi opinion, en inglés nunca diría "hervir la sangre" para significar algo aparte de "enojarse" si como el escritor está usando la frase me parece fuera de contexto. De todos modos, es una imagen chistosa, unos muchachos parados en la tienda calentándose sólo por estar cerca de la ropa de mujeres. De acuerdo que así son jóvenes...y algunos adultos que he conocido también...pues, mejor dicho: así son los hombres y no creo que sea algo que haya aprendido en la escuela wink

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by alba3
I like your translation!! So it is the `wind women`that are tired, aha!
I like your version but I'm surprised at your thinking Boiling blood is out of context here. I guess maybe it's a guy thing. :)
...maybe I've heard of blood boiling in this context but very, very rarely...it could just be me
hmmm, I dont know what you mean by"the exhausted women of the wind."; buena parte en español;)
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I have the same question for herniada. It's not herniated...so... I'm lost with this word. And so the phrase: "la herniada hembra del viento" is a complete mystery to me. How did Yesero get the answer?

When I think of somebody herniado, I think of somebody not walking straight, so the wind is doing this to the clothes:

alt text

so the clothes are not hanging straight, this is an image of course, I cannot be absolutely sure if he wanted to say that, but I thought yesero's interpretation was great, rippled in the wind, just my thought.

Like this flag, rippled in the wind. alt text

updated MAY 12, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Asi que ya veo. Muchisimas gracias Heidita. :)
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O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

Siempre a tu servicio grin

Tendales en Lisboa:

alt text

We use the phrase: tender la ropa

This is from RAEwink

tendal.

  1. m. Conjunto de cosas tendidas para que se sequen.
updated MAY 12, 2010
posted by 00494d19
¡Ay querida! Esto es la razón que eres amado por todo el mundo. ¡Muchas gracias!
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Querida Heidita,

Por favor, explicarnos la ultima frase:

O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

Tendales- This isn't the clothes...so what is it? The dictionary defines it as a load, heap, awning.. even the RAE doesn't help. How does this word function in the sentence?

I have the same question for herniada. It's not herniated...so... I'm lost with this word. And so the phrase: "la herniada hembra del viento" is a complete mystery to me. How did Yesero get the answer?

It was an awesome thread. A real challenge!

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by Goyo
posted by Goyo
Thanks, Goyo. I was meaning to ask and had forgotten. I'm pretty sure that tendales are clothing racks but I'm only guessing that from a google search. The other part I don't get.
Goyo, it was like reading between the lines. That's why I stated it was definately not a translation but rather what I felt as I read his words.
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[As] young men we did not even need to see a naked woman to get our blood boiling. It was enough to walk by the haberdashery and inhale the delicate fragrance of the lace. Or to stop us from contemplating how feminine clothing moved in the wind of the broken awning (?).

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by LaBurra
why "stop us"? and no, the translation is not too good, next time, lis;)
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Desafortunadamente, leí los otros traducciones primero y ahora no es justo si traduzco la frase. Voy a hacerlo la próxima vez.


Mi opinión:

Qué maravilloso ser -- jóven y sentirse así. Descubrir el sexo opuesto es una de las experiencias más memorables de la vida.

Alvite escribe sobre esto en una manera muy romántica. Debido a sus palabras, puedo visualizar la escena.

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by --Mariana--
estoy de acuerdo, en este caso Alvite ha usado una imagen muy delicada, la del viento y las puntillas me encanta:)
Thank you for the corrections :-) I try and pay more attention to my "gender of nouns."
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La tradución ya está hecha, así solo voy a comentarlo:


¡Qué** lástima que este sentimiento no dure toda la vida!** ;(es limitado a los días de la juventud)!wink

What a pity this feeling doesn't last a lifetime!; (is limited to the young days)

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by luz_72
Gracias Heidita:)...qué lástima, tantos errores en solo una frase:(
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The boys didn't even need to see a naked woman in order to make their blood boil. It was enough for us to pass by in front of the fabric shop and smell the delicate aroma of the lace. Or for us to stop and contemplate how the women's clothing was moving in the wind

¡Ay caramba! ¿Qué lengua es esta? Si no hubiera mirado -- la traducción de Yesero hablaría algo acerca de toldos y mujeres con heridas de ingle. --------LOL

Me pongo en el rincón del burro.

updated MAY 11, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by Goyo
Oh my, I had to go look up ingle - what IS this - hernias in that area? que risa.
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This should be interesting, smile

Los muchachos ni siquiera necesitábamos ver a una mujer desnuda para que nos hirviese la sangre. Nos bastaba con pasar por delante de la mercería y aspirar el delicado aroma de las puntillas. O pararnos a contemplar cómo movía la ropa femenina en los tendales la herniada hembra del viento.

The boys don't even need to see a woman naked for them to get their heartbeats going (boil the blood but I thought it was a reference to getting excited about the learning process). They only need the haberdashery and breathe in the delicate aroma of their nails. (speaking to the boys simply seeing a girl--getting excited) Or stopping and seeing how the girls moved their clothing in the wind. (I'm not sure about ...en los tendales la herniada) wink I hope it's close. Can't wait to get feedback.
As for children learning about sex when they are 7 years old...no way!!! I truly feel being a teacher and a parent that this is the job of the parent and the school is in partnership with the parents. If the parents were on board with this decision, so be it but as for me, developmentally it's not appropriate.

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by Jason7R
wrong tense jason, read the body of the thread more carefully;)
I wonder though...nails?? they are nowhere mentioned
puntillas does come up in the dictionary as nails.
it does...hmmm, strange, I must look, has nothing to do with nails though, well , you know;)
Thank you and I will. This is going to be interesting. Yeah for "puntillas" all I got was nails until the dictionary then I saw "tiptoes". :)