HomeQ&AHola! I am brand new to Spanish and I'm doing some study on Ser and Estar.

Hola! I am brand new to Spanish and I'm doing some study on Ser and Estar.

1
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I am working on Ser and Estar and using the answers to do it (this is so great by the way!) Any-who I noticed that when you say Ser Verde it means to be green while if you say Estar Verde it means to be unripe.

Now I'm very new at this and I don't have a good ear for languages but I do like the written word and I've learned that if I can learn to read and write it I learn much better. When I'm working on things I also like to try to look ahead and guess at what rules there may be by the patterns.

Anyway, none of that is really important, but it explains the thoughts behind my question... which is.

In English green is both a color as well as meaning being unripe, too young, or inexperienced... Is this the same thing it means in Spanish? I know it's a color, and if I'm reading the chart right then that means it's also inexperienced or not ready. So am I reading it right? lol.

The second part of the question (which only really matters if I'm reading it right) is will I find a lot of these similarities in the languages while learning Spanish. I already have noticed a lot of the words mean the same, or sound the same.... but what about words that mean more than one thing like Verde? Will I find a lot of words that mean two things in English and Spanish and match? I've looked into some obvious ones (like to, too, and two) but they don't seem to do that. So if I'm reading it write is it a coincidence.

I'm sorry if this post was annoying or in the wrong spot or in anyway doing something wrong, lol.

1707 views
updated ABR 25, 2010
posted by lillyrose

4 Answers

1
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Also, here's a lesson on Ser vs. Estar, which is located under the More tab at the top of this page. Go to Reference and you'll see Spanish Grammar and Verb lessons.

updated ABR 25, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
1
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Wow, thank you all so much :-D Cool everyone is nice lol

Thanks for the link mariane that's actually what I'm working on when I came across the verde thing lol. It threw me off for a little but that's ok. I've been online too much today and my brain hurts, lol.

Thanks again guys.

updated ABR 25, 2010
posted by lillyrose
0
votes

Lillyrose, welcome to the forum. Your question is in no way annoying and is in the correct category. As you progress in your studies you're going to find a lot of sililarities in the two languages and even more things that simply don't make any sense. That' what makes this site so interesting and helpful. I'm going to let someone else actually answer your question about green while I go research it myself.

updated ABR 25, 2010
edited by Yeser007
posted by Yeser007
0
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Yes, you are correct in that "verde" can mean "inexperienced."

I'll let someone more fluent in Spanish answer the rest of your question about the similarities between English and Spanish phrases. I have found that some are the same, yet some are very different.

Have a look at the Phrasebook (located under the More tab at the top of this screen) and put in a key word to search the phrases.

Welcome to the forum, Lilly...have fun!

updated ABR 25, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
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