Yo me doy el gusto de ser más churro que el protagonista de la películar.

2
votes

Yo me doy el gusto de ser más churro que el protagonista de la película.

Seen on a billboard advertising beer outside a cinema.

2 things

  1. What does it mean? Especially "churro"

  2. What is that "superfluous" (Yo) doing at the beginning of the sentence? grin grin

3641 views
updated ABR 19, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
jejejejej, this guy goes to the dunce corner too!!! lol..oh, and getting his head chocpped off, I am forgetting...lol

9 Answers

3
votes

So to elaborate on Carlos-F's definition, the phrase would very roughly mean, "I love that I'm more attractive than the star of the movie." It's sort of weird. "Me doy el gusto" would usually mean more like, "I allow myself the pleasure of being more attractive etc..." but that's also a bit odd in English. I assume it was supposed to be película, not películar.

updated ABR 18, 2010
edited by MacFadden
posted by MacFadden
Yes pelicula - I waited for a friend looking at this trying to figure it out for about 10 mins.
Is your avatar showing the Scottish Highlands?
Why, yes, it is the Scottish Highlands. :)
3
votes

Churro/rra (pop.) Hermoso (referido a personas jóvenes y atrayentes), lindo/a.

updated ABR 18, 2010
posted by Carlos-F
1
vote

Regarding the "superfluous" "Yo", I think that just because it is not necessary, doesn't make it superfluous.

I disagree. "superfluous" means 'unnecessary'/"serves no purpose" In your sentence is serves to emphasize the disjunction of your opinion from that of others. It is not simply a question of "Would this sentence make sense without the use of 'yo'? but, rather, would it mean the same thing?

I entirely agree with Heidita (and others) in their condemnation of the use of personal pronouns (when they serve no useful function [especially those made explicit by the form of the verb]) but we all know that they (pronouns) can be used for rhetorical effect.

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by samdie
I like your explanation. I know what I mean, but I am unable to express it as clearly as you have done. Thanks.
1
vote

Churro has already been dealt with. I only know "churro" as the yummy fritter, so no further comment there.

Regarding the "superfluous" "Yo", I think that just because it is not necessary, doesn't make it superfluous. When used in this manner, it adds emphasis to the fact that "I am doing this". To my view, it increases the sense of ownership over an action or a responsibility.

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
Tell Heidi that - please!
I value keeping my head over my shoulders, thank you! ;-) Besides, oftentimes the "Yo" is indeed superfluous. I guess knowing when to use it is one of those "practice" things.
1
vote

This is also a churro, ¡delicioso! alt text

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by 00494d19
El desayuno más delicioso. Y saludable. :)
Oh si, ¡MUY saludable! ¡Especialmente relleno con dulce de leche o chocolate!
1
vote

How funny, I was guessing it was a spelling mistake for chulo, churro is quite the opposite in Spain.

Esto es un churro, this is a garbage, nonsense....

updated ABR 18, 2010
posted by 00494d19
or maybe just maybe "culo" :)
culo?? why, not in spain
Trasero = culo in Bolivia
0
votes

churro = good looking

I am pleased to be more handsome than the actor

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by Anton100
0
votes

I was amazed at the different meanings of this depending on locale.Check out our dictionary.

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by nizhoni1
0
votes

Un churro refiriendose a la película, quiere decir que la película fue malísima. Churro means a really bad movie. Churro has different meanings like curl, a type of dessert showed above, bad movie.

updated ABR 19, 2010
posted by 00e46f15