HomeQ&AThe earlier you start to work, the earlier you will go

The earlier you start to work, the earlier you will go

1
vote

The earlier you start to work, the earlier you will go from the office

Is this correct?

2163 views
updated ABR 5, 2010
posted by nila45

5 Answers

2
votes

As an alternative, I would say "The earlier you arrive at work, the earlier you can leave (the office).

Several elements/words in your sentence are open to different interpretations. "earlier" usually means "early in the day" (or with reference to some stated time frame e.g. "early in life"). It can be used in an absolute sense but, for that, we normally use "sooner". Thus, "The sooner you begin (the/your work), the sooner you will finish." (In this case "work" does not refer to a place of employment but, rather, some job/task/homework/etc).

"start to work" can mean "begin working" (on some task or at your 1st employment) or it can mean "depart your house in order to go to your place of employment". In the former sense, "start work" narrows the meaning down to "begin working". In the latter sense, "start for work" would be clearer. From an employer's point of view, when you start for work is largely irrelevant. What matters is when you arrive at work that counts. Of course, many workers spend the first half-hour of the morning finishing their breakfast and socializing with their co-workers, so that when you arrive may not be when you start working.

"you will go from the office" is somewhat unusual. "go from" is usually paired with some information about a destination e.g. "I'll go from the office (directly) to the theater and meet you by the ticket window." If you simply mean "depart", "leave" is a better choice (this is, basically, the English version of the ir/irse "problem"). In this same part of the sentence "you will go", although grammatically correct, is odd. "you will be able to leave" or "you can leave" are much more likely.

As Jeezzle's suggestions show, "get" is a popular word (with many meanings) for English speakers. As Nicole's 2nd sentence shows, this can be confusing for non-natives (her first use of 'get' means 'arrive' and the second [within the same sentence] means 'to be able' /'have the opportunity').

updated ABR 5, 2010
posted by samdie
Very useful information samdie. - renaerules, ABR 3, 2010
2
votes

Good morning Nila,

Unfortunately, this is not correct. This is how it should be written:

The earlier you start work, the earlier you can leave the office.

or

The earlier you get to work, the earlier you get to leave the office.

Another option:

The earlier you begin work, the earlier you can go home. smile

updated ABR 3, 2010
edited by Nicole-B
posted by Nicole-B
2
votes

No.

  1. The earlier you get to work, the earlier you can leave.
  2. The earlier that you get to work, the earlier that you can leave.
  3. The earlier you get to the office, the earlier you can go home.
  4. The earlier that you get to the office, the earlier that you can go home.
updated ABR 3, 2010
posted by jeezzle
1
vote

Running a company as I do, I have to put the comical side to this question. All these answers are open to question. The correct answer as far as the boss is concerned appears below.

The earlier you start work, the more money I will earn, hehe.

Having said this, jeezle has provided the majority of correct interpretations.

updated ABR 3, 2010
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Nicole said:

The earlier you start work, the earlier you can leave the office.

I think this one is the best answer to your question.

updated ABR 3, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
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