HomeQ&AWhy there is a conjugation chart of nevar if there is no such a thing.

Why there is a conjugation chart of nevar if there is no such a thing.

2
votes

The verb nevar can not be conjugated with people as an intend to communicate people's action. Can somebody tell why there is this chart on the website conjugating NEVAR with all of the pronouns? I snow, You snow, He/she snows??? It does not exist and it is not right!

3314 views
updated ABR 29, 2010
posted by gatubelaminina

5 Answers

3
votes

Not necessarily. You could be writing a story form the viewpoint of Mother Nature. In that case, it's perfectly reasonable for Mother Nature to say, "Yo nievo." Just because it doesn't happen under normal circumstances doesn't mean you can't conjugate the verb to express it.

updated ABR 29, 2010
posted by KevinB
Very creative... You are right. - MeEncantanCarasSonrisas, ABR 28, 2010
2
votes

The verb nevar can indeed be conjugated in all the tenses (It snows, it is snowing, it will snow, it snowed, it has snowed, etc.) It cannot be conjugated in the first and second person (you can't say I snowed, we are snowing, you have snowed, etc.) That's what this person was asking. The verb conjugation chart showed "nievo" which directly translates to "I snow" which sounds just as rediculous in Spanish as it does in English.

updated ABR 28, 2010
posted by bburney06
It can be conjugated in the first and second person, it is just not used because it makes no sense. - MeEncantanCarasSonrisas, ABR 28, 2010
1
vote

"Nevar" is a verb, and the fact that it is not an action that people realize doesn't mean it doesn't happen. Something else causes the action, it doesn't have to be people: God, the weather, itself... it just happens! Works just the same in English, if you think about it: "It snows" - therefore it will snow, it snowed, it's snowing. Has nothing to do with Peter snowing, or Mary having snowed.

The same goes for rain, (llueve, llovió, lloverá), thunder (truena, tronó, tronaba...) and any number of actions that people cannot perform... Although figuratively someone can thunder, as in when someone roared very loudly: "El viejo tronó improperios ante su rabia incontenible".

updated ABR 29, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
0
votes

You could be writing a story form the viewpoint of Mother Nature. In that case, it's perfectly reasonable for Mother Nature to say, "Yo nievo." Just because it doesn't happen under normal circumstances doesn't mean you can't conjugate the verb to express it.

We had a very similar thread over a year ago and I made the same argument (albeit, less succinctly). It is important to distinguish between "what is rarely said (unusual)" and what violates the normal rules of a language (grammar).

Many people seem to confuse "I've never heard this expression." with "It is incorrect."/"It sounds foreign to me." This should be taken as a statement about the speaker's experience (perhaps, people who have never ventured forth from their native villages).

updated ABR 29, 2010
posted by samdie
0
votes

It's something that is accurate grammatically but doesn't make sense and is not used. You can say "I snow every Tuesday" and, grammatically, it is correct, but logically.... well, that's a different story.... That is why there is a conjugation chart- because it can be conjugated, it's just up to you not to use it.

updated ABR 28, 2010
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
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