HomeQ&Ain/at the break, I play football

in/at the break, I play football

3
votes

I would like to know if it is possible to say:

in the break, I play football. (en el recreo, juego al fútbol)

at the break, I play football. (en el recreo, juego al fútbol).

Thank you.

10297 views
updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by nila45

9 Answers

2
votes

In the break, I play football. (en el recreo, juego al fútbol)

at the break, I play football. (en el recreo, juego al fútbol).

Hi Nila,

Both of these sentences sound awkward in English. Assuming you are talking about a "break" during the day, whether at school, etc. Dandi is correct. Most people would say "During the break, I play football." Another common way of saying this is "During break time, I play football." or "At break time, I play football."

When a "break" is being discussed, usually it is addressed in the following ways"

Before the break...

During the break...

After the break...

However, as with all of these expressions, there could be some colloquial differences here and there. smile

updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by Nicole-B
Very clear Nicole! :) thanks - Benz, FEB 12, 2010
4
votes

You mean a break between classes or semesters? I would say "At break, I play football" or "During break.." I would not use the article THE but perhaps some people would.

If you mean specifically the break between classes in the middle of the day for schoolchildren, then, where I am, we call that recess

At recess, I play football

updated FEB 12, 2010
posted by 003487d6
1
vote

I can't say that I disagree with what has been said here so far. At recess, during the break, or during my break all sound fine to me. It is also possible to say on my break.

On my break, I like to play football

• At work, when I am on my break, I try to practice my Spanish.

Regarding "at the break" you could probably say this if you were trying to indicate the point in time that you were going to initiate this action. For example:

• I left my book in my car. At the break I am going to go out to my car and get it.

This has a strong implication that as soon as the break occurs you will initiate the action of going to your car to retrieve the book.

When you say on my break or during the break or at recess there is a strong implication that this action is performed over a duration of time (up to and possibly including the entire time that the break lasts).

updated FEB 12, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
1
vote

I agree with the rest of the answers you've received from Dandi, Nicole, and Webdunce.

I would add that if someone asked you "What do you do during the break" (at work or school, for example) you could respond with "I play football at the break."

However, like Nicole said, the following seem to be more common:

Before the break...

During the break...

After the break...

So, in response to what you do "during the break" you'd most likely say "During the break I play football."

updated FEB 11, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Actually, while perhaps not the most common way, At break, I play football also sounds fine, especially in regard to how at is used. However, we would not say In break..." And, we would not use the here either (I can't explain why we don't use the).

Dandi's is the way to say it if the break is recess at school, which I assume it is because at work no one plays football during their break.

But, at work, one might say, I play sudoku during my breaks. (Breaks would be plural because we usually get more than one break per day).

(In reality, I am more apt to say I usually play... or I like to play..., but that might just be me...I hate making flat-footed assertions.)

updated FEB 11, 2010
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
0
votes

Hi nila45 (is the 45 referring to your age? hehe)

When I was at school the breaks were known as,

Mid morning/afternoon - Playtime

Between morning/afternoon - Lunch time

Also like Izanoni, we would have used "during" and also without the definite article.

updated FEB 13, 2010
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
I think I prefer your first answer without editing. - nila45, FEB 13, 2010
0
votes

I would say "At break, I play football" or "During break.."

Interesting, dani, I would never have used at.

During break, that's it. Interesting the article not being used. why do things have to be just the other way round?? confused

Well in Spain: En el recreo juego....

By the way, recreo is only used for children, Recess is not used over here.

LOL

updated FEB 12, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

I have found extremely interesting all your answers.

But, anyway, I would like to center on the word "break" when we are referring to "el recreo". This is the word that we use for children's break at school.

"At recess" could be one of them.

What happens with "break" in that context? Are your answers with "break" useful for that context?

I found very interesting the expression "at break time", perhaps because I have just remembered that I have learned it before. I do not want to miss the opportunity to have an overall idea of this expression too. Can this be used for school and other situations?.

I am learning more than I expected with this thread.

updated FEB 12, 2010
edited by Eddy
posted by nila45
0
votes

No he oido nunca at the break, pero vamos a esperar.

updated FEB 11, 2010
posted by 00494d19
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