HomeQ&AHow would you say "to break even" or the "break even point of a business' financial statements/records"? Thanks.

How would you say "to break even" or the "break even point of a business' financial statements/records"? Thanks.

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I am translating a document for a Business Plan Clinic/Project Overview. The question is as follows: "What is your break-even point according to your financial statements or projections?"

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updated ENE 5, 2010
posted by aadache

2 Answers

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salir sin ganar ni perder

salir a la par

salir hecho

salir ras

salir tablas

cubrir gastos

updated ENE 5, 2010
posted by lorenzo9
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I did find this verb (although I’ve never heard it spoken) in the dictionary

  • compensar un saldo = to net out

This actually was a little tough to find a something that would come close ‘to break even’ since in English, this phrase alone is almost senseless…how does one break something yet remain even? Plus, the terminology regarding credit/debit balances or accounts is a little different between English and Spanish:

For example, when we think of a balance (net worth=saldo neto) as either being in the credit or in debit.

Spanish Finance terms do not necessarily follow the same logic (while the logic for the Financial Model of credit/debit does).
Un saldo neto (net worth) is determined by

  • positivo de ganancias (positive gains)
  • pérdidas imputables (attributed losses)
  • obligaciones (liabilities) y ventajas (assets)

What seems to be the right terminology to determine where that breaking point is could be

  • un saldo neto = net worth
  • saldo neto en benificio = net profit balance
  • margen neto de ganacias = net profit margin

I’ve included the following, but I’ve not personally heard them:: - - Saldo exacto = exact balance - El saldol equilibrio = balanced net worth - saldo puro limpio = no net worth, free of debt

updated ENE 5, 2010
edited by bdclark0423
posted by bdclark0423
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