HomeQ&AI'm trying to learn to use the verb gustar, while I understand using the indirect pronouns (me gusta etc.) can someone give me an example for how you would use "gusto"?

I'm trying to learn to use the verb gustar, while I understand using the indirect pronouns (me gusta etc.) can someone give me an example for how you would use "gusto"?

0
votes

I'm trying to learn to use the verb gustar. While I understand using gustar with indirect pronouns (i.e. me gusta), can someone give me an example or explain when I might use the first person singular form "gusto"?

2728 views
updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by Laura-Lee

4 Answers

1
vote

Yes, if you are ever pleasing to someone else and you are also the person stating that fact.

"My sister likes me" could be said, "Le gusto a mi hermana," which literally means (word for word), "To her I am pleasing to my sister."

updated DIC 17, 2009
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
0
votes

the direct object is the person who does the liking action, and the conjugation tells which peron is liked no lo gusto he doesn´t like me no me gusta i dont like it, him, or her no te gustan you dont like them

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by israelyplane
gustar in this usage is intransitive. There are no direct objects, only indirect objects, therefore it is "no le gusto", not "no lo gusto." - 0074b507, DIC 18, 2009
If you are looking at the English sentences there are d.o.'s, but not in Spanish, that is why it is translated as "is pleasing to" so that you see that it is to him, to her, indirect objects. - 0074b507, DIC 18, 2009
0
votes

Te gusto. You like me.

¿Cómo saber si le gusto? How do I know if he likes me?

Gusto is also a noun meaning pleasure.

Lo haría con gusto. I'd do it with pleasure.

Or taste:

No tienes buen gusto. You don't have good taste.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by 003487d6
Just a fine point, but gusto in the last two examples is used as a noun and not a verb, that is to say it is not the 1st person singular form of gustar - it just looks like it. - webdunce, DIC 17, 2009
I know and I stated that too :P - 003487d6, DIC 17, 2009
Oops! Totally missed that! o.Õ - webdunce, DIC 17, 2009
0
votes

I think you want to avoid using "gusto" in the first person, because it implies a lot more than "like" in English. From what I´ve heard, saying "¿te gusto?" is sort of like saying "but do you really like me (wink wink)".

Anyway, I´d say stick with the third person!

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by kattya
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.