Do you say "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Holidays"?

5
votes

In the United States this becomes an issue every year. Small but vocal groups of people attack anyone and any business or government agency that uses the term "Merry Christmas". Is this common throughout the rest of the world?

5920 views
updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by elcielo

10 Answers

4
votes

Well, in America we celebrate Christmas because our country is built on Christian morals and values (although that's rapidly deteriorating). However, others are welcome to practice their own holiday beliefs as long as they understand in America we celebrate Christmas. At the same time though, many companies bend over for these people who whine about Christmas commercials so that in return they make higher sales. I call these guys, sellouts. Jaja, anyways, I personally celebrate CHRISTmas and always will, and it's called CHRISTmas, not X-mas. Fair enough? grin

I can edit your post. Try it again.

updated NOV 27, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by DJ_Huero
ok, well, for some reason I can't edit my post, but degrating wouldn't be the right word, the word I was looking for would be "deteriorating".
thanks qfreed, i still can't, something is going on with the computers here at work.... =(
2
votes

Probably not very common in downtown Tehran or Shanghai where Christianity is not the predominant religion. Of course, then neither is "Happy Holidays" if it doesn't coincide with local holidays that occur at the same time like Chanakuh or Kwanzaa. I'm not sure that Christmas is a world event.

updated NOV 27, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
2
votes

I say Merry Christmas and I am not ashamed to say it. This has been a hot topic in the US for a few years now, but I think the trend is starting to turn around.

I would never think of asking my Jewish or Muslim friends to change the name of one of their holidays in order to keep me from feeling excluded. It is after all, their holiday.

I know that Jesus was probably not born on December 25th, but it is the agreed upon day to celebrate His birth. So for me, I am in agreement with DJ. I am keeping the "Christ" in Christmas.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by Nicole-B
thank you =)
1
vote

I understand that this can be an issue in the larger cities, where the population is more varied, and perhaps more militant, but in the rural areas we still say "Merry Christmas" on the way home from the children's Nativity play.

My Hindu business associates send me a case of wine with a Christmas card, and I reciprocate at Diwali.

My atheist friends send cards with robins on them marked "Season's Greetings", and my Jehova Witness friend simply ignores the whole thing.

It's still a happy time, however you choose to celebrate it.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by sheila-foster
agreed
I like the part about the JW friend jejejeje
1
vote

"Happy Holidays" is the political correct expression used by the big chain stores to avoid conflict with non-Christian consumers.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by Mokay
The operative word being "consumers".
1
vote

Yes. For years and years in England we always used to say "Merry Christmas" and a "Happy New Year". For some reason people and the media have now started to say "Happy Christmas".

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by Eddy
"Happy Shopping!" is more like the real Christmas in the States... (Amusing movie making the circuits: "What would Jesus buy?")
0
votes

The holiday marks the deepest part of the winter in the northern hemisphere and is universally celebrated with lights in every culture. The importance of it is that the longest night is also the beginning of longer days - the return of the the sun and the advent of the new year's growing season. It is celebrated everywhere, even in the southern hemisphere because of the socio-political dominance of northern hemisphere people.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by TreyGreene
0
votes

"Happy Holidays" is the political correct expression used by the big chain stores to avoid conflict with non-Christian consumers.

Then what is the holiday for? Has anyone tried to ask the person who wishes one a "Happy Holiday" - what holiday (are you talking about)?

As for quoting Mokay, I did it because I could not phrased that as well as he did. I hope he dose not mind it.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by Zoltán
Wow!!! I'm going to try that at work (seriously). I've never thought of it like that. =)
Not at all!.
0
votes

I forgot to mention it, I am a Roman Catholic (RC) but not a religious person. I wish I could be, but Sears and Roebuck do not sell faith.
On the other hand, I am a strong believer in all Christian holidays, celebrate most of them, or at least think what they are all about. The little kid does not get out of you even if you are in the 70s.grin

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by Zoltán
0
votes

I confuse them all and say Happy Hanukkah! (I'm not Jewish)

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by aloshek
I worked for a mail order company once and had people send gifts marked "Happy Winter Solstice"