HomeQ&AI come across a phrase "mal rayo..." which doesn't quite make sense in its literal translation "bad ray" what is meant by this?

I come across a phrase "mal rayo..." which doesn't quite make sense in its literal translation "bad ray" what is meant by this?

0
votes

I come across a phrase "mal rayo..." which doesn't quite make sense in its literal translation "bad ray" what is meant by this?

Also, if I might get two for the price of one, I come across this sentence:

con antifaz, sentado a una mesa escribiendo

I am not sure if the subject is seated at a table writing (himself preforming the action) or whether he is seated at a writing table

How is one to know?

7898 views
updated MAR 17, 2016
posted by Zachary-Santamaria

8 Answers

0
votes

I would say he is seated at a desk writing as the word for writing table in Spanish is escritorio. I'm still looking checking on malo rayo...

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by aloshek
Thanks for the help. I am trying to read a bit of Jose Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio. I would estimate that it would take about hour for me to comprehend a page! - Zachary-Santamaria, NOV 14, 2009
1
vote

Mal Rayo te parte really means "May a bad lightning bolt split you!"

Rayo is the word for lightening in Spanish. Mal is bad te parte means split apart.

It is usually said in frustration, at least by Cubans. When things are going wrong, the car won't start, nothing seems to be going right: Mal rayo te parte!

updated MAR 17, 2016
posted by fabiom28
since there is not a direct translation I can give you all some examples where it is used. - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
When you go to the doctor and get a shot that hurts you say "mal rayo parta" ... not cursing at the doctor but expressing the pain. - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you get in the car for work and the car doesnt start - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you get in a ride at six flags and get really scared - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you are going to change a flat tire and the wrench slips and you hit the groung with your knuckles. - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you are going to drink coffe and it's too hot - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when a cop tells you to pull over - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you go to a fast food to get breakfast at 10:31am and they stopped serving it at 10:30am. - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when your multiplayer kicks you out because your internet stopped working - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
when you are months planning a road trip and wake up with the runs - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
So... a direct translation is not necessary as long as you get the idea. If you can't get it yet...then..."mal rayo parta" - drfreezman, MAR 17, 2016
0
votes

In regard to Don Juan, since I'm nearly positive that's what you're reading...this might help. Don Juan Tenorio by José Zorrilla

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by aloshek
Sorry, didn't see your note above. - aloshek, NOV 14, 2009
0
votes

I'm wondering, are you reading Don Juan? If so, is it the book or the play?

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by aloshek
0
votes

The expression "mal rayo te parte" is somewhat akin to "blast you!" It's wishing ill on the person to whom it is addressed.

As to your second question, wouldn't "writing table" use a preposition? Una mesa de escritora? And there is even a Spanish word for "writing table"- escritorio.

I would take your sentence to mean that the person was sitting at a table, writing.

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by Goyo
Yes it would use a preposition. I was thinking English. Thanks for the help. - Zachary-Santamaria, NOV 14, 2009
0
votes

Mal rayo me parte means "God d* it" (as said above, about the same)

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by aloshek
0
votes

"mal rayo" is an expression that is used pejoratively. I don't swear, but you will catch my drift..."mal rayo" - "To H--- with it!"

Would this make sense in the context?

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by mountaingirl123
Perhaps. The sentence is--Mal rayo me parta si, en concluyendo la carta no pagan caros sus gritos! - Zachary-Santamaria, NOV 14, 2009
0
votes

Mal rayo is a bad scratch.

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by albert-fabrik-
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.