Sentado y despedido: strange use of participles?

2
votes

Okay, I've encountered what I consider strange usage of participles in a movie: The Incredibles.

In several places, where, in English we would say "Be seated" (a command), the characters look at another and appear to say simply "sentado." The mom (Elastigirl) says this to her kids, and Bob's (Mister Incredible's) boss says it to Bob once. I would have thought it should be said "¡Sientate!"

In another place, Bob's boss says (as Bob is leaving to stop a mugging in progress), "¡Detente ahí o despedido!" which means "Stop there or you're fired!" I would have thought it should be said "¡Detente ahí o estás despedido!"

Both of these can be found in a scene between Bob and his boss between 00:27:23 and 00:29:10...English version / Spanish sound track...

Did I hear it right or wrong?

And, if I heard it right, is there some grammatical rule that covers such uses of participles?

2003 views
updated NOV 13, 2009
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
That is an interesting question webdunce. Now I am curious because I was just reading about particples.

8 Answers

6
votes

Actually, sentado (be seated), callado (be quiet), quieto (be still), concentrado (be focused), etc., are commonly used to give commands to children, pets, etc.

They are used a lot by people with authority when addressing subordinates. (or police officers addressing a suspect).

They are considered very rude when used with strangers.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by Mokay
You get "best answer" because you said it first.
yes, very true:):)
2
votes

Oooh thanks heidi. I'm going to use that in class TODAY! jejeje - Valerie

With children we do this often:

¡¡Todos callados!!

¡Sentados todo el mundo!

¿Pero qué os he dicho? ¡¡Quietos todos!!

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Perfect! I'm glad I checked back before I left for work! :)
1
vote

MOkay, quieto yes, that is very often used, but that is not a participle.

We sometimes do use this but with a subject:

¡Todo el mundo concentrado!

¡A ver, todo el mundo sentado!

but to simply utter: sentado or despedido...sin ton ni son, that is very odd.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Oooh thanks heidi. I'm going to use that in class TODAY! jejeje
As a teacher I need to take this down. Who knows...? ;))
You can say "sentado" when talking to one person, "sentados" when talking to a group of persons. When a teacher enters a classroom, he can says "Sentados por favor" to his students.
1
vote

Well, I think the boss said, "Sentado, Bob" if that matters.HI web, well, it actually does. If you say this with a name or something, that is different.

Bob!! Despedido!!

That is perfectly understandable and idiomatic in Spain at least.

Of course, the more correct form would be:

¡Estás despedido!!

Pero se entiende así muy bien.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
1
vote

Your revision seems correct. Only !Sentado! might be used in some cases but not very often.

I can’t believe they couldn’t get somebody to use proper Spanish.

"¡Detente ahí o estás despedido!" or "¡Detente ahí o quedas despedido!" --- are correct.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 0068e2f4
0
votes

Is it normal that when speaking almost any language, that so-called "important" words are dropped?

Such as when I just said to my neighbor: "Me voy Tucson hoy."

Who cares about the missing "a?"

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
0
votes

Thanks all. It's helpful to know I can expect this.

When I first watched the movie I was trying so hard to make sense of it and I figured it must be "sientalo" or something (not that that makes sense either). Then I just watched it yesterday and my understanding of spoken Spanish has improved somewhat (and I wasn't listening as hard this time), and I was like, "Hey, they just used 'sentado'...as a command...I'm sure of it."

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by webdunce
0
votes

We sometimes do use this but with a subject...

Well, I think the boss said, "Sentado, Bob" if that matters.

But I may have heard it wrong. I am hoping someone listens to it and makes sure I'm hearing it right.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by webdunce