HomeQ&Apor más que te tongonees siempre se te ve el bojote.

por más que te tongonees siempre se te ve el bojote.

1
vote

le dijo a su monigote,

por más que te tongonees

siempre se te ve el bojote.

El cura San Juan de Dios

le dijo a su monigote,

por más que te tongonees

siempre se te ve el bojote.

What are "Tongones" and "Bojote" ? As in the lyrics of the above song?

5730 views
updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by tobyone

4 Answers

1
vote

"Tongonees" is the 2nd pers. pl. in the present subjunctive of "Tongonear".

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tongonear. 1. tr. coloq. Ven. contonearse. U. t. c. prnl.

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Reported by Izanoni, Aug 27/99-----> I wasn't sure what the U.t.c. prnl stood for, but I found it in another forum and apparently it stands for "Usado también como pronominal" or also used like a pronomial (i.e. to serve the purpose of a pronoun).

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contonearse. (De cantonearse). 1. prnl. Hacer al andar movimientos afectados con los hombros y caderas. A man swaggers, a woman swings or wiggles her hips (sashays) Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

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bojote.

  1. m. Col., Hond., P. Rico y Ven. paquete (? lío o envoltorio).

  2. m. Col. y P. Rico. Persona gruesa.

  3. m. El Salv. Bola o amasijo de material blando.

  4. m. despect. coloq. Hond. Niño de pequeña estatura de entre tres y diez años.
  5. m. despect. coloq. rur. Hond. Excremento humano en forma de bulto.

estar alguien hecho un ~ . 1. loc. verb. coloq. P. Rico. Estar mal vestido.

estar de a ~.

  1. loc. verb. coloq. R. Dom. Tener mucho dinero.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados


These were all the words I found but I don't have any idea how to make them all work in the context of the phrase(s) presented in the question.

Does anyone else know how to make them work??

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by Moe
0
votes

Tongonees appears to be a verb.

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by webdunce
0
votes

It may be a play on the word tongo (fixing relating to boxing) and bojote (which refers to a large box (boj =species of tree)

Aren't ón(es) and ote suffixes related to large sizes?

Not a native, pure guess work.

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Good question. I didn't find them in this online dictionary.

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by nizhoni1
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