HomeQ&AHow to say 'I want you' without meaning 'I love you'

How to say 'I want you' without meaning 'I love you'

1
vote

Usually I would use Quiero, e.g. Quiero una cerveza. But I've read that if I use this same logic to 'I want you' it would be be 'Te Quiero', but I've read that that translates into 'I love you' instead.

That could lead to an unfortunate misunderstanding.

5858 views
updated SEP 26, 2009
posted by archerboy86

8 Answers

3
votes

The trouble is that Spanish is a romance language. There are only 16 phrases that don't mean I love you and they all have to do with fishing.

updated SEP 25, 2009
posted by Seitheach
lol - webdunce, SEP 25, 2009
jejejejejejjejejejejejejeje - 00494d19, SEP 25, 2009
1
vote

you say "te deseo". it means i desire you. hence want you. "te quiero" is i like you. and "te amo" is i love you.

updated SEP 25, 2009
posted by cest555
please note that it is mandatory on this forum to use correct spelling, grammar, and capitalization in your posts. - - 00494d19, SEP 25, 2009
1
vote

Just don't look her in the eye when you say it.

updated SEP 24, 2009
posted by Seitheach
1
vote

Use it in an English sentence. There may be a way to avoid the whole want/desire thing.

updated SEP 24, 2009
posted by webdunce
0
votes

How about ..... A ti te gusta mucho... or is this completely off the beaten track?

updated SEP 26, 2009
posted by caza
That would be something like "it pleases you very much." - webdunce, SEP 26, 2009
Yes I realized my mistake straight away - still working on it, thanks. - caza, SEP 26, 2009
0
votes

Thing is, "I want you," by itself in English sounds quite suggestive, too. So, I was asking for more context. WHY are you saying "I want you?"

If you are, for example, trying to say "I want you to (do something), then querer presents no problem.

Example: Quiero que saques la basura. (I want you to take out the trash).

See how, in Spanish, you are not saying "I want you" but instead you are saying "I want that you..."

But, then the question is, is this a rude way of asking someone to do something. In English, this comes across as an order much as a parent might give a child or as a manager might give an employee.

I want you to take out the trash (a demand) vs. Would you take out the trash? (a request)

Would that be: ¿Sacarías la basura?

I'm kinda rambling now.

updated SEP 26, 2009
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
0
votes

You could say, Sos la persona que más quiero en el mundo. I'm pretty sure that means I really like you. wink

updated SEP 25, 2009
posted by Seitheach
0
votes

What you are looking for is : te deseo, not necessarily love implied.wink

updated SEP 25, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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