Voy a tener mi traductor aquí mañana por la mañana.

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Is that really the way you say: "I will have my translator here tomorrow morning." ?

3955 views
updated SEP 19, 2009
posted by RachelC

10 Answers

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"Mi traductor será aquí mañana por la mañana."

It should be "Mi traductor estará aquí..."

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Nick-Cortina
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I´m a little unsure about using tener that way. It might be okay, though.

How about saying simply "My translator will be here tomorrow morning," which is "Mi traductor será aquí mañana por la mañana."

By the way, "mañana por la mañana" is how you say tomorrow morning. I have also heard "mañana a mañana," but "mañana por la mañana" is the official way, so I would use that. It´s that way because in Spanish mañana means both tomorrow AND morning.

updated SEP 18, 2009
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
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Mi traductor va a venir mañana por la mañana.

My interpretor is going to come tommorrow morning.

updated SEP 19, 2009
posted by kenwilliams
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I think I've heard "mañana por la mañana" to indicate sometime tomorrow morning. I've also heard "mañana a las ocho de la mañana" if there is a specific time. I think I would also use the personal "a".

Voy a tener a me traductor aquí mañana por la mañana.

It might sound a little softer to say "Mi traductor va a estar aquí conmigo mañana por la mañana."

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by CalvoViejo
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Thanks for all the suggestions. I just wanted to be sure. Mañana having two meanings is a little confusing.

Rachel

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by RachelC
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How about ".....el diá de hoy."

I see it writen and I have used it in conversation. It seems to be used to emphasize that something will be accomplished this day.

I don't know what the translation is; could it be -- "the day of today" (literal); -- "this day" (guess) -- or maybe just "today".

Any ideas?

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Daniel
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I have seen "mañana por la mañana" in textbooks. However, in practice it seems I usually hear people say "mañana temprano" (early tomorrow) when they mean tomorrow morning, perhaps to avoid the repetition. smile

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Valerie
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¿Mañana por la mañana? ¿Lo quiere escribir?

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Goyo
Do I want to write it? No I'm going to tell this person I will have someone here "tomorrow morning".
I wasn't familiar with that idiom either!
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I was just wondering because it looks like I'm repeating the same thing twice but guess that's ok.

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by RachelC
You got it. "mañana por la mañana" = "tomorrow morning". "...... mañana por la mañana temprano" = "...... early tomorrow morning".
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Looks good to me. However I am only a beginner.

updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Daniel