HomeQ&AYou are completely aware and informed of what your rights are.

You are completely aware and informed of what your rights are.

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"You are completely aware and informed of what your rights are."

What is the best way to translate this?

The "translator" that is reading this from a document says, "Está total [sic] consciente e informado de cuáles son sus derechos."

The difficulties are with the "informado de [subordinate clause]," and with the compound predicate nominative/adjective (in the English sentence) that calls for both ser and estar (in the Spanish translation).

My version is, "(Usted) Es (completamente) consciente, y está completamente informado, de sus derechos, cuáles son."

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the first completamente (with consciente) is unnecessary here. I am also unsure of how to phrase this compound sentence where both clauses share the common prepositional phrase. If I were sight translating (on the spot), to avoid confusion, I would repeat or partially repeat the prepositional phrase with each clause, but I would like to know the most concise way to translate this.

2399 views
updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco

7 Answers

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...I changed angles in mid-sentence and forgot to edit.

I'm glad it's not just me that does that!

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by patch
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... and they can point out a fresh point of view, ...

and they can offer/provide/suggest/tender a fresh point of view.

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.Thanks. That is a better wording. I changed angles in mid-sentence and forgot to edit.

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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... and they can point out a fresh point of view, ...
and they can offer/provide/suggest/tender a fresh point of view.

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by samdie
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Thanks, Lazarus.

No, this was not a question. The "cuáles son" business at the end makes it appear that it could be, doesn't it?

I was thinking of it as a clarification (kind of like an appositive, but not really) like we have in English: "... you are completely informed of your rights, (of) what they are." If that were to work at all in Spanish, I guess it would have to be " ... informado de sus derechos, de cuáles son," but that is not necessary since Lazarus gave several less complicated ways to translate the sentence that sound more natural in Spanish.

Again, the problem is the same obvious one we keep encountering when dealing with two languages ... "Language A is not Language B, and each language states things in ways particular to its own grammar, syntax, and mindset."

This is another reason I appreciate the forum ... One can sit here and look at a sentence and think that it makes perfect sense, but that is only because he knows the context, and because he is incorrectly comparing it to his own language's syntax. However, when he puts that same sentence before native/fluent speakers who have little/no context and are not seeing the sentence through the filter of the other language, and they can point out a fresh point of view, then he sees that the sentence is truly defective.

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Rocco, so this is not a question'

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I'd go for any of these:

Es completamente consciente de sus derechos, y está informado sobre ellos.
Es completamente consciente de sus derechos, sobre los cuales está informado.

Your attempt is a bit suspicious grammatically, but it doesn't sound bad once you remove that bit at the end, which makes non sense to me at all:

Es (completamente) consciente, y está completamente informado, de sus derechos[del]**, cuáles son**[/del].

If you really want a subordinate with another "to be":

Es completamente consciente de cúales son sus derechos, y está informado sobre ellos.
Es completamente consciente de cúales son sus derechos, sobre los cuales está informado.

Es (completamente) consciente, y está completamente informado, de cúales son sus derechos[del]**, cuáles son**[/del].

But maybe someone else has a better suggestion. I am not a professional translator.

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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For what it's worth, to me, ending your translation with *cuales son *implies that you are about to list off what the rights are, as if you had ended your preposition with a colon instead of a period.

I think that it should say cuáles son sus derechos as the translator says.

updated AGO 4, 2009
posted by Nathaniel
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