HomeQ&AWhat is that mean this sentence? "A él le gusta este concierto."

What is that mean this sentence? "A él le gusta este concierto."

0
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The "A" is problem for me? Thank you

4294 views
updated AGO 27, 2009
posted by HuseyinErkmen
HI Hsey, the correct question should be with the verb to do: What does this sentence mean? :) - 00494d19, AGO 27, 2009

6 Answers

3
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"A él" is the indirect object. Indirect objects must be introduced by "a". That's it.

updated AGO 26, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
I really want to understand this now, too, given that in an English construction, one can place an indirect object before the direct and omit the preposition. I gave the the doorknob a pull. I tossed the bird some crumbs. (cont.) - Janice, AGO 26, 2009
(Aside from the fact that my examples may be lousy and even maybe wrong,) do I understand that I can never do this in Spanish. I can only omit the preposition in the case of using pronouns? (I can, can't I?) I would like to be sure I've understood. - Janice, AGO 26, 2009
1
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In case you wish to do any further reseach on this use it is commonly referred to as the "personal a" in many of the Spanish grammar websites online.

Please delete this answer and then bury the ashes in a very, very deep hole. Stupid answer. Must have been daydreaming.

updated AGO 26, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Do you have a favorite link for a discussion of this "personal 'a'"? - Janice, AGO 26, 2009
The term "personal a" is only used for direct objects. Indirect objects always have an "a", whether they refer to people or objects. - lazarus1907, AGO 26, 2009
Janice, i like for the personal a, i like the following site: http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/personal_a.htm - webdunce, AGO 26, 2009
What the heck was I thinking about. Apparently not this question. - 0074b507, AGO 26, 2009
1
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Even though the "a" is confusing to you, you understand that the sentence translates into English to something similar to "He really likes this concert." Right?

I know about the "a", but it would be mistaken for me to try to explain it to you here with my limited knowledge of the correct "grammar" words.

One thing I can help you with: the preposition "a" is very important and often used to express the relationship of some verb to a person....we could say, perhaps, "in the direction" (hmm) of a person. So the "gustar" ...the pleasing....is happening "to" him (él).

Well, I warned that I do not know the correct way to explain this, but maybe this can be a start for you until we get a good answer!!

updated AGO 26, 2009
posted by Janice
A direct translation would say,"to him, he likes this concert." adding the "a" makes the statement specific to a person, it adds emphasis. - joeWaverage, AGO 26, 2009
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Thank you All

updated AGO 27, 2009
posted by HuseyinErkmen
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edit - i like lazarus1907's answer

updated AGO 26, 2009
edited by cheeseisyummy
posted by cheeseisyummy
Then vote it up. - 0074b507, AGO 26, 2009
i did, i just didnt know how to delete my original post here so i said that instead - cheeseisyummy, AGO 26, 2009
how do i delete my answers anyways, theres only an edit button? - cheeseisyummy, AGO 26, 2009
You can't delete questions or answers, even your own. But if you edit it to "please delete" or some such thing, a moderator will be happy to oblige. - Toph, AGO 26, 2009
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"A direct translation would say,"to him, he likes this concert." adding the "a" makes the statement specific to a person, it adds emphasis. - joeWaverage" (I don't know how to bracket someone else's quote, so I just copied it here.)

I think a more literal translation is: "to him the concert is pleasing". The "le" preceding "gusta" would indicate "to him" on its own. The "a él" clarifies who "le" refers to.

updated AGO 26, 2009
posted by DR1960
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