Spanish Alphabet Pronunciation

The Spanish language is quite easy to pronounce since most letters only have one sound. The list below will serve as a guide for how to pronounce each letter alone and in combination with other letters.

LetterPronunciation of Spanish Letter NamePronunciation Tips
a
 
a
 
This letter like the ah sound you would get if you said English my and omitted the last ee sound.
b
 
be
 
This letter may sound much like an English b. Especially when it occurs between two vowels, it is pronounced with the lips not touching, quite close to the pronunciation of the Spanish v.
c
 
ce
 
This letter sounds like English k in most cases. Before e or i, it sounds like an s (or like the th in thick in many parts of Spain.)
ch
 
che
 
While this is not considered a letter anymore by the RAE, it sounds like the ch in cheese.
d
 
de
 
This letter sounds much like an English d, except you should place your tongue against your upper teeth instead of the roof of your mouth when pronouncing it. It often sounds like a whispery th sound, especially when it comes between two vowels.
e
 
e
 
This letter like the eh sound you would get if you said English mate and omitted the last ee sound.
f
 
efe
 
This letter sounds like the English f.
g
 
ge
 
This letter usually sounds much like an English g. Before e or i, it sounds like a harsh English h. It's very similar to the j in Spanish.
h
 
hache
 
In general, this letter is silent. However, in words adopted from other languages, the breathy aspiration is maintained. For example, Hawái .
i
 
i
 
This letter sounds like English ee but shorter. Before the vowels a, e, and o, it makes a y sound.
j
 
jota
 
This letter sounds close to the English h sound, but it varies from country to country. In some places, the sound is very harsh in the back of the throat (like you are trying to spit something up). It never sounds like the English j.
k
 
ka
 
This letter is uncommon in Spanish, but sounds much like the English k with less breath.
l
 
ele
 
This letter sounds close to the English l, but with the tongue raised closer to the roof of the mouth rather than dipped down.
ll
 
elle
 
While this is not considered a letter anymore by the RAE, it has a distinct y sound (like in English use) in most countries. In other countries it can sound like the g in genre or the s in pleasure.
m
 
eme
 
This letter sounds just like the English m.
n
 
ene
 
This letter sounds just like the English n.
ñ
 
eñe
 
A completely separate letter from the n, this letter sounds much like the ni in onion or the ny in canyon.
o
 
o
 
This letter sounds close to o in so, but shorter.
p
 
pe
 
This letter sounds close to the English p, but with less breath.
q
 
cu
 
This letter is always followed by the letter u and sounds like English k.
r
 
ere
 
This letter sounds similar to the d sound in English caddy in most cases. At the beginning of a word, or when doubled up, it has a trilled sound.To trill the rr , say English brr, but instead of using your lips to make the r, use your tongue. When you exhale, the tongue should be raised and widened so it touches the upper teeth.
s
 
ese
 
This letter sounds just like the English s.
t
 
te
 
Softer than the English t, in Spanish the tongue touches the teeth and there is no explosion of breath after moving the tongue away.
u
 
u
 
This letter sounds close to the oo in food, but shorter.
v
 
ve
 
This letter sounds much like the Spanish b. The lips do not touch and there is less aspiration.
w
 
doble ve
 
This letter is not native to Spanish, but sounds similar to English w.
x
 
equis
 
This letter is usually pronounced like the ks in English socks. However, in place and person names (especially those from Mexico), it can be pronounced like a raspy English h, an s, or even the s in English show.
y
 
i griega
 
Most of the time, this letter sounds like the English y in yes. At the end of a word, it sounds like the letter i.
z
 
zeta
 
This letter is mostly pronounced like the English s, but can sound like the th in English thin in many parts of Spain.

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