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I use livemocha for Spanish lessons and several people who reviewed my exercises included the phrase "sigue asi". What does it mean'

  • Posted Jul 18, 2009
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I use livemocha for Spanish lessons and several people who reviewed my exercises included the phrase "sigue asi". What does it mean?

Without the sentence for context it's difficult to be precise, but it may be similar to etc. (et cetera) or et al (and the like).

Seguir=to continue, to follow
seguir

así=thus, in that manner
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/así

continue on thusly
or
and so on...

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It is like :keep on doing a great job ! in case thay are complimenting your spanish .

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It is like :keep on doing a great job ! in case thay are complimenting your spanish .

Keep it up! (commonly used both to encourage and to threaten-if you keep that up....)

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I looked it up and the translation was:"it follows thus"

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I looked it up and the translation was:"it follows thus"
That's a possible translation but, in this case (with the context that you provided), "sigue" is not the 3rd person present indicative; it's the familiar (tú form) command "Continue!" It could be translated as "Continue thus(ly)!" although the more normal English expression would be what Quentin provided "Keep it up." / "Keep up the good work."

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Sorry, please delete. Somehow ended up with a double post here. See below.

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I looked it up and the translation was:"it follows thus"

Welcome to the forum, Toothy!

Samdie is absolutely right. I was about to amend my post to address that, and I noticed that samdie had posted while I was typing.

That's the problem with machine translators ... they don't understand meaning. Translation is not an A = B business.

For example, a machine would not know what you meant if you said, "You didn't turn right." Does that mean, "You didn't rotate your body in the correct manner"? Or does that mean, "You didn't take a turn to the right hand side"? You would say these two things completely differently in Spanish. This is why human translators always insist on context, because that is the only thing that lets you know what is actually meant by the words, and meaning is the goal of the translator, not a word-for-word dictionary rough translation.

That's why you see things like "Close the door" being translated "Near the door," because machines can't tell the difference between the verb close and the adjective close (or the noun close or the adverb close, for that matter).

My point is that you have to learn the language, and not depend on some computer program.

Hope you learn lots on this website! Lots of people have come a long way in their Spanish here.

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I looked it up and the translation was:"it follows thus"

Try to translate "What's up'" into another language using one of these machines. Up? Shall we look up to identify what it is?

What's up?
Up? The sky / the ceiling

Machine translators are useful for words like television or microphone, which usually have a single one-to-one translation; otherwise they produce a lot of rubbish, because they don't understand the language, so they can't translate.

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