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2 Vote

Hola a todos en este repetable foro, Quisiera que por favor me indicaran cual es el uso apropiado tanto de (into), como de (onto), pues me he confundido algo con su uso en una oración.
Muchas gracias de antemano por cualquier sugerencia que me puedan brindar.

  • Posted Jul 18, 2009
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14 Answers

1 Vote

Hola a todos en este respetable foro, Quisiera que por favor me indicaran cual es el uso apropiado tanto de (into), como de (onto), pues me he confundido algo con su uso en una oración.

Muchas gracias de antemano por cualquier sugerencia que me puedan brindar.

onto=encima a (enlaces al diccionario)

into=dentro de

¿Puedes darnos un ejemplo del contexto donde estás confundido?
Can you give us an example of the context in which (en cual') you cannot select the correct word?

For other beginners: he is asking for advice on the proper use of into .vs. onto. (prepositions/preposiciones)

Context not provided.

1 Vote

Hola a todos en este respetable foro, Quisiera que por favor me indicaran cuál es el uso apropiado tanto de (into), como de (onto), pues me he confundido algo con su uso en una oración.

Muchas gracias de antemano por cualquier sugerencia que me puedan brindar.

onto=encima de

into=dentro de

¿Puedes darnos un ejemplo del contexto donde estás confundido?

Sugiero que leas las entradas (que hagas clic en los enlaces) que puso Quentin arriba, dado que cada palabra tiene varias traducciones y usos. Y como dice Quentin, si tienes alguna duda relacionada con un contexto en particular, puedes exponérnosla aquí, y te ayudamos al respecto.

Good evening, Quentin.

You might want to be careful about giving one hard and fast translation for these words (as with most words). As you can see from your links to the dictionary entries, there are almost an endless number of ways they can be translated, depending on their context, (which you asked for to be able to give a more complete answer). The problem with giving an X = Y translation and then asking for context is that some people will make the rigid connection of "into = dentro de" and forget that the essence of translation is context. Then they are frustrated when "The car ran into a curb" doesn't coincide with their rigid definition of "into = inside of".

By the way, thank you for all you do to help people on this site. You are a gold mine of references, resources, and solutions, and no one on this site is more willing to help than you are. So please don't take my words as criticism or discouragement from helping people. They are meant as precisely the opposite.

1 Vote

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Good evening, Quentin.

You might want to be careful about giving one hard and fast translation for these words (as with most words). As you can see from your links to the dictionary entries, there are almost an endless number of ways they can be translated, depending on their context, (which you asked for to be able to give a more complete answer). The problem with giving an X = Y translation and then asking for context is that some people will make the rigid connection of "into = dentro de" and forget that the essence of translation is context. Then they are frustrated when "The car ran into a curb" doesn't coincide with their rigid definition of "into = inside of".

No problem. I screw up all the time. I've learned to accept deserved criticism. I was disappointed to see that you felt that you had to write to me in English, however. I may not be able to write worth a d''n in Spanish, but I do enjoy trying to read it.
Actually, when I wrote the translations I was trying to think about the contexts in which they might be confused. Spatial locations were the ones that come to mind as I cant imagine confusing onto and into if you're discusssing "I'm onto your scheme" or "I'm "into" Rap music."
Now that I consider it further, I can see how mapping set A into or onto set B could be confusing if you weren't familiar with the language.
Point taken and thank you for the compliments. I think we are fortunate to have a lot of members here with a desire to help in whatever way they can (even if the help is sometimes flawed grin .)
I'm also glad to see that you put the accent on the "cual". I looked at it and couldn't decide if it needed it or not. For me, donde and cual aren't quite as easy as words like que and como to decide whether they need the tilde or not. I think it is because que usually changes from that to what and como from as to how, but donde and cual are still where and which with or without the tilde.

1 Vote

Otra cosa. Into y onto significa (en general) movimiento y/o direción. Obviamente tenemos in y on las cuales realmente trata de ubicación.

Ejemplos:

The dog is in the room
The dog walked into the room

The pen is on the table
John put the pen onto the table

1 Vote

Otra cosa. Into y onto significa (en general) movimiento y/o direción. Obviamente tenemos in y on las cuales realmente trata de ubicación.

Ejemplos:

The dog is in the room

The dog walked into the room

The pen is on the table

John put the pen onto the table

Sí, pero ésos no son los únicos sentidos de esas palabras. Ve el diccionario. Nada más un ejemplo entre varios: 'to translate something into English.?

Y tus ejemplos, se pueden decir de igual manera con 'in? y 'on'.

The dog walked in the room.

John put the pen on the table.

No quiero que nadie vaya a pensar que es obligatorio usar 'into? y 'onto? en estos contextos.

1 Vote

Sí, pero ésos no son los únicos sentidos de esas palabras. Ve el diccionario. Nada más un ejemplo entre varios: 'to translate something into English.?

Y tus ejemplos, se pueden decir de igual manera con 'in? y 'on'.

The dog walked in the room.

John put the pen on the table.

No quiero que nadie vaya a pensar que es obligatorio usar 'into? y 'onto? en estos contextos.
"to translate something into English" This, to my mind, does, indeed, incorporate the idea of motion (albeit at a rather abstract level); the the thought is going/being carried from one language to another.
"The dog walked in the room." This one is somewhat problematical. With "in" there are two possible interpretations: "The dog was in the room and was walking around." or "The dog entered (walking) the room." Using "into", rather than "in" serves to remove that ambiguity.

"John put the pen on the table." is, in some sense, a counter-example. "onto" is certainly possible but the normal phrase (implied motion, not withstanding) would use "on".

1 Vote

Duplicated response.

1 Vote

Sí, pero ésos no son los únicos sentidos de esas palabras. Ve el diccionario. Nada más un ejemplo entre varios: 'to translate something into English.?

Y tus ejemplos, se pueden decir de igual manera con 'in? y 'on'.

The dog walked in the room.

John put the pen on the table.

No quiero que nadie vaya a pensar que es obligatorio usar 'into? y 'onto? en estos contextos.

"to translate something into English" This, to my mind, does, indeed, incorporate the idea of motion (albeit at a rather abstract level); the the thought is going/being carried from one language to another.

"The dog walked in the room." This one is somewhat problematical. With "in" there are two possible interpretations: "The dog was in the room and was walking around." or "The dog entered (walking) the room." Using "into", rather than "in" serves to remove that ambiguity.

"John put the pen on the table." is, in some sense, a counter-example. "onto" is certainly possible but the normal phrase (implied motion, not withstanding) would use "on".

In both examples "into" and "onto" serve to clarify or emphasize, but my point was, for the non-native English speaker that posted the original question, that they are not required in those examples. You will commonly hear "The dog walked in the room," and it is assumed that he passed into the room from without. Otherwise, one would specify, "The dog walked (around) within the room."

However, my main point was that movement/direction is not the only meaning/sense/usage of these words. I keep referring to the dictionary. The one on this site also lists these examples:

into

**2. en (with change)
to change into something -> convertirse en algo
to grow into a man -> hacerse un hombre
to translate something into English -> traducir algo al inglés
to break something into pieces -> romper algo en pedazos
3. en relación con (regarding)an inquiry into the accident -> una investigación sobre el accidente
4. (with time)rain continued to fall well into the summer -> siguió lloviendo hasta bien entrado el verano
5. (Math)three into six goes twice -> seis entre tres cabe a dos
6. (familiar)she's really into folk music -> le gusta or va mucho la música folk (español de España)
he's really into my sister -> le gusta un montón or mogollón or (español de España) un chingo mi hermana (español de México)

  1. Además de.
    What are you into -> ¿a qué te dedicas
    Into the bargain -> además del trato, por demás, como adición
    To change something into something else -> convertir algo en otra cosa
    To go off into the desert -> adentrarse en el desierto
    To get into a plane -> subirse a un avión
    To walk into -> entrar en
    The lorry drove into the car -> el camión chocó contra el coche
    To be into something -> dedicarse a, apasionarse por**

Denota: (a) entrada en, (b) penetración a través de algo, (c) inserción, inclusión, (d) cambio de estado, (e) por, multiplicado por.

onto

**1. sobre, encima de to jump onto something -> saltar sobre algo
to fall onto something -> caerse encima de algo
to get onto somebody -> ponerse en contacto con alguien (contact)
to be onto a good thing -> habérselo montado bien
I think the police are onto us -> creo que la policía anda detrás de nosotros

  1. Por encima de, sobre; uso incorrecto en vez de on. (n)**

I feel like a broken record saying that, when dealing with translation from one language to another, with most words you cannot make a blanket "A = B" equivalence. "Into" does not always mean "dentro de". "Onto" does not always mean "encima de".

What's more, the original question was from a native Spanish speaker wanting to know the appropriate use of these words. I imagine he wanted to know when to use them as opposed to using "in" and "on". So we need to either give him a complete answer (including all the senses of the words, as the above dictionary entry does), or solicit a specific context from which to make an accurate rendering. I don't think it is fair to him (or to anyone else reading the thread) to say no more than, "into = dentro de, and onto = encima de" (as if that meant, "Every time, all the time, no matter what"). That gives the learner of English the incorrect idea that "Any time I want to say 'dentro de' I have to use 'into', and anytime I want to say 'encima de' I have to use 'onto'."

1 Vote

Muchas gracias por todas las indicaciones que me han sugerido, ya que veo que es muy necesario conocer el contexto total de la oración en la que va la palabra para conocer su significado . Ya que una traducción de la palabra sola,( into), (onto) no proporciona el significado real de la oración completa.

1 Vote

Correcto, Rodolfo.

Imagínate la palabra 'en', o 'por'; ¿cómo las traduces al inglés? Hay cientas de posibilidades, ¿no', dependiendo del contexto. Por eso dije que no es justo sólo decir 'Significa 'in'? o 'Significa 'by'', porque dependiendo del contexto, cada una puede traducirse por un sinnúmero de palabras en inglés, y eso da una idea equivocada, o por lo menos incompleta, a los que buscan aprender.

Y es por eso que siempre exigimos más contexto, para dar un sentido correcto y preciso, como busca el interrogador.

1 Vote

Hola a todos.

A mi me gustaría saber que significa la frase "Driving onto the lot". Le he dado mil vueltas y no le encuentro significado.

Muchas gracias

  • Hola, peka, y bienvenida al foro. ¿Dónde encontró ese frase? ¿Puede darnos más contexto? Suena raro en inglés. - MacFadden Sep 1, 2010 flag
1 Vote

"Driving onto the lot"

Other phrases would be "pulling into the lot", etc. They refer when you first drive (enter) your vehicle into a parking lot.

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  • But isn't it normally "driving into the lot"? - MacFadden Sep 1, 2010 flag
  • both are used - 0074b507 Sep 1, 2010 flag
  • Huh. Maybe it's a regional thing; I've never heard 'onto'. Good to know. - MacFadden Sep 1, 2010 flag
0 Vote

Hi Guys

I was going to reply to this thread from Rodolfo.

Having read all your replies I am leaving well alone.

I don't want to lead Rodolfo into anymore confusion.

Having said that let's move onto something else. grin

0 Vote

In english the use of "Onto" and "Into" is very much subject to idiomatic usage by context. See this thread here for a great discussion of this.

It's not even always logical. For example, I get onto a bus, but get into a car. I could go on for pages more...

  • It is often erratic, but the particular example you mention does seem defensible. One gets onto a bus because buses are higher than cars and you have to climb up and get onto them. One gets into a car because it's much higher or lower than before. - MacFadden Sep 1, 2010 flag
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