How to say "meet" in Spanish | SpanishDict Answers
Do you #LoveSpanish? Share why for a chance to win $15,000 in scholarships from SpanishDict. Learn more!
report this ad
0 Vote

I'm having some trouble expressing how people meet (by arrangement, not by chance). I understand that Spanish has several words, such as 'encontrar? 'reunir? 'verse? and 'quedar? but I don't know which to use when talking about planned, casual encounters. The dictionary examples are all over the place and I'm getting more confused each time I do a search.

Here are a few things I'd like to say and my attempts at translating them into Spanish. Any corrections and/or suggestions are greatly appreciated.

Dónde quieres reunirnos para tomar el café?
(Where do you want to meet for coffee')

¿Dónde quedamos mañana?
(Where should we meet tomorrow')

Vamos a reunir en el restaurante a las ocho.
(Let's meet at the restaurant at 8 p.m.)

Está bien, voy a encontrarte a las ocho.
(Okay, I'll meet you at eight.)

Quedamos en vernos a las ocho.
(We agreed to meet at eight.)

La encontré en el restaurante a las ocho.
(I met her at the restaurant at eight.)

Nos reunimos todos los sábados para tomar el café.
(We meet every Saturday for coffee.)

  • Posted Jul 10, 2009
  • | 29110 views
  • | link
  • | flag

16 Answers

1 Vote

Dónde [b]quedamos para tomar el café? [/b]

¿Dónde nos vemos para tomar café' (I prefer "quedar" here)

(Where do you want to meet for coffee')

¿Dónde quedamos mañana?

(Where should we meet tomorrow')

Vamos a **[b]quedar **en el restaurante a las ocho.[/b]

Vamos a vernos en el restaurante a las ocho. (again, I prefer "quedar" here too)

(Let's meet at the restaurant at 8 p.m.)

Está bien, voy a **[b]verte **a las ocho.[/b]

Está bien: quedamos a las ocho.

(Okay, I'll meet you at eight.)

Quedamos en vernos a las ocho.

Quedamos a las ocho.

(We agreed to meet at eight.)

[b]Me **encontré **con ella en el restaurante a las ocho.[/b]

(I met her at the restaurant at eight.)

Nos reunimos todos los sábados para tomar el café.

(We meet every Saturday for coffee.)

0 Vote

Try looking up the verb CONOCER and clicking on "Full Translation"
It might help you.
PS I have exactly the same problems that you have illustrated.

0 Vote

Try looking up the verb CONOCER ...

It's my understanding that "conocer" is used only for first time meetings.

For example "I finally met your friend Juan last night." (Por fin, anoche conocí a tú amigo Juan.)

0 Vote

Thank you Lazarus - to the rescue yet again.

0 Vote

Thank you, Lazarus.

0 Vote

Nos reunimos todos los sábados para tomar el café.

(We meet every Saturday for coffee.)

Why did you choose to leave the definite article here? That sounds to me like they are going to drink some specific coffee earlier agreed upon, or that all parties know which coffee is meant by "the coffee."

I thought that a general noun like this went without the article, like in English.

¿Comes mariscos?
¿Hay tomates?
¿Sirven carne en el restaurante?

Help me out here.

0 Vote

Nos reunimos todos los sábados para tomar el café.

(We meet every Saturday for coffee.)

I didn't see that: I was too concentrated looking at the verbs.

Normally, you'd say "tomar café", but if you are talking about a some sort of special or long time tradition, you can say "el café" too, but it sounds almost like a ritual, since that "el" would make that coffee time something unique and well known. If you are exaggerating on purpose, or trying to be funny, it's ok too, of course. In English it would be similar, I'd guess, but a bit less common.

0 Vote

Would unirse not be a possibility'

0 Vote

Would unirse not be a possibility?

Only if they are getting married or forming a joint society.

0 Vote

Would unirse not be a possibility?

Only if they are getting married or forming a joint society.

That's not quite what I had in mind. LOL

0 Vote

Nos reunimos todos los sábados para tomar el café.

(We meet every Saturday for coffee.) Why did you choose to leave the definite article here?

It was an error on my part; I should not have used the definite article "el" in this case because it was coffee in general that I was referring to.

0 Vote

I had the impression that "juntar" is a particular favourite when trying to choose which verb to pick when trying to express the idea of meeting up or joining someone (for a coffee in this case).
eg. "Junta con ellos"

0 Vote

eg. "Junta con ellos"

There you go, Maaaaaak, leaving those "aaahhs" off again! Juntar.

0 Vote

I had the impression that "juntar" is a particular favourite when trying to choose which verb to pick when trying to express the idea of meeting up or joining someone (for a coffee in this case).

eg. "Junta con ellos"

"Juntar" is transitive, so it requires something (or someone) to put together with something else (e.g. con ellos). In your sentence you are not saying what are you putting together with "ellos", ie. the direct object. If you don't require this object, because it is simply you who is getting together, then you require a detransitivizing SE:

Se junta con ellos.

This pronominal verb is translated as meet up, get together, but it is used more to stablish general relationships between friends.

0 Vote

A few monhs ago, the website http://www.mepsyd.es/redele/revista3/lidia_lozano.shtml
was recommended as a good resource to explain how to use "SE".

Would you agree that in the case of "se junta con ellos", the 'se' comes under the category of "SE INTRANSITIVADOR CON SUJETO VOLUNTARIO"'

Answer this Question
report this ad