the difference between el pez and el pescado | SpanishDict Answers
1 Vote

It seems both means the same = fish. What's the difference'

  • Posted Jun 19, 2009
  • | 4879 views
  • | link
  • | flag

12 Answers

1 Vote

pez is the animal, pescado is the food

1 Vote

El pescado is the one that has been caught. El pez still in the water. Si te gustan los peces vete al acuario. Si te gusta el pescado te vas al restaurant.

0 Vote

Your best answer will come from the native speakers, but I have come to understand that there is a difference between the two terms. How subtle that difference is will best be answered by the Sr. Members/Administrators who are native speakers.

The idea I have developed by reading/observing conversation--and this is not hard and fast, as I have seen this totally ignored--is that it is a pez while it is in the water, and a pescado once it is caught/in one's possession. A native speaker once made a comment to me to this end, in a joking manner, so I don't know if there is some official definition somewhere that indicates this.

Pescado is also the past participle of the verb pescar, and in that respect translates "caught," so maybe there is something to that.

According to Real Academia Española one definition among many for each of the words is as follows:

pez: Pescado de río.
(River fish.)

pescado: Pez comestible sacado del agua por cualquiera de los procedimientos de pesca.
(Edible fish taken from the water by any of the fishing processes.)

To me it is telling when the definition of each word contains the other.

What do you say, Lazarus, Toni, Heidita, woajiaorobert, others ...'

0 Vote

I guess brevity beat me to it.

0 Vote

Here some example phrases:

¿Qué van a almorzar? ¿Pescado, carne (de res) o pollo? What are you going to have for lunch? Fish, beaf or chicken?
Prefiero el pescado frito. (I prefer the fish fried)
El pescado es una buena fuente de proteina. (Fish is a good source of protein)
¿Cómo desovan los peces? (How do fish lay eggs')
Necesito comprar unos peces para mi acuario. (I need to buy some fish for my aquarium)

0 Vote

The difference is like the English pairs (which don't exist in many languages):

Cow - beef
Veal - calf
Pig - pork
Deer - venison
Sheep - mutton

One is a living animal (Anglo-xason root); the other is its meat (Norman root).

To me it is telling when the definition of each word contains the other.

What do you say, Lazarus, Toni, Heidita, woajiaorobert, others ...?

The first definition (the long one) describes the animal in the water. The second one (the one you include here) appears to include "pescado de río", so I guess you can also say you can eat "pez". What I don't understand is why this definition doesn't include sea fish too. Strange. In practice, anyway, "pez" is for living animals, and "pescado" for captured fish for food.

0 Vote

La palabra "peces" no se utiliza para comida. Se suele utilizar cuando el animal está en el agua como bien dice Lazarus.
La palabra "pescado" se puede utilizar tanto para comida como para referirse al pescado que hay en el agua. Es decir, yo podría decir: "hay mucho pescado en el mar" o también puedo decir: "hay muchos peces en el mar". Y también puedo decir: voy a comprar algo de pescado en el supermercado.

0 Vote

When you snorkel you obsrve "pez". When you go fishing you go for "pescado" (even though they are living and swimming).

Also watch out for "huesos" and "espinas". Huesos -- are human/mammal bones; and Espinas -- are fish bones. I learned this by one of my many conversational mess-ups in Mexico.

0 Vote

Como parece que en inglés no hay diferencia entre "pez" y "pescado", ¿están bien estas frases':

There is a fish in my plate
There is some fish in my plate

O ¿sólo debo utilizar "a fish" cuando me refiero al animal (por ejemplo en el agua de la pescera o en el mar) y no a la comida'

0 Vote

When you snorkel you obsrve "pez". When you go fishing you go for "pescado" (even though they are living and swimming).

Also watch out for "huesos" and "espinas". Huesos -- are human/mammal bones; and Espinas -- are fish bones. I learned this by one of my many conversational mess-ups in Mexico.

Very insightful, Daniel. And thanks for the tip on "espinas".

0 Vote

Como parece que en inglés no hay diferencia entre "pez" y "pescado", ¿están bien estas frases':

There is a fish in my plate

There is some fish in my plate

"There is a fish on my plate," si estás hablando de un pescado entero. = "Hay un pescado en mi plato".

'There is some fish on my plate,? si te refieres a una porción (de tamaño indefinido) de carne de pescado. = "Hay algo de pescado en mi plato".

"There is fish on my plate" indica que hay ese género de comida en tu plato. = "Hay pescado en mi plato". (La falta de algún artículo le hace más general al sustantivo.)

'There are some fish on my plate? o "There are fish on my plate" quiere decir que hay más de un pescado en tu plato. = "Hay unos pescados en mi plato" o "Hay pescados en mi plato". El plural de 'fish? es igual, 'fish,? o también 'fishes,? pero, por lo menos en los EEUU, ésta es una forma antigua. Se suele usar 'fish? para el plural.

O ¿sólo debo utilizar "a fish" cuando me refiero al animal (por ejemplo en el agua de la pescera o en el mar) y no a la comida?

En el inglés, no hay diferencia entre el uso en cuanto al animal o a la comida, ni el singular ni el plural. Nada más debería prestar atención al artículo (o falta de lo mismo) que acompaña la palabra, tanto en inglés como en español. Considera:

There are (some) fish in that lake.
Hay (algunos) peces en ese lago.

There is fish in the kitchen. (comida)
Hay pescado en la cocina.

There are fish in the kitchen. (comida, pescados enteros)
Hay pescados en la cocina.

0 Vote

Gracias por la ayuda. No lo he puesto, pero con este tema he abierto un nuevo foro "fish contable o incontable".

Answer this Question