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Please correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is this:
To speak in the informal future tense (or whatever you would like to call it), you can use one of two methods...

Estoy yendo a hablar contigo.
I am going to talk to you.

(Yo) voy a hablar contigo.
I am going to talk to you.

Again, I am not entirely sure if the above is correct, but that is my understanding.
My question is this -- Do these sentences really mean the same thing? Yes or no, and why? If not, how are they different?

Thank you in advance to anyone who can help smile

  • Posted Jun 6, 2009
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  • the correct answer for Iam going to talk to you is voy a hablar contigo thanks and good luck rosalina - Jose-romero Sep 15, 2009 flag

34 Answers

0 Vote

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is this:

To speak in the informal future tense (or whatever you would like to call it), you can use one of two methods...

Estoy yendo a hablar contigo.

I am going to talk to you.

(Yo) voy a hablar contigo.

I am going to talk to you.

Again, I am not entirely sure if the above is correct, but that is my understanding.

My question is this -- Do these sentences really mean the same thing? Yes or no, and why? If not, how are they different?

Thank you in advance to anyone who can help smile
The first is really weird. You're in the act of (at this moment) going to speak...?
You haven't yet quite started to speak but are pulling yourself together to do so ...
The second is the usual way to say this (at some point in the near/distant future, you are going to speak ...

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And then there is the awkward... I have been going... He estado iyendo

When I first started learning Spanish, I heard that you must only use the 'ing' verbs if you are ACTUALLY DOING IT RIGHT NOW.... but in English it's acceptable to use the 'ing' in the past tense, so I continue to do so in Spanish...

So confusing; I tend to try not to worry about it and just use it as I'd use it in English.

I've forgotten half of the verb rules already but do know them - but I don't know how they got like it haha

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[del]Estoy yendo a hablar contigo[/del].

I am going to talk to you.

(Yo) voy a hablar contigo.

I am going to talk to you.

The first is simply a direct and wrong translation of the tense in English.

I am going to + verb is in Spanish: voy a + verb

this sounds especially wrong and makes it clearer, I think, if you say:

I am going to go to the theatre.

estoy yendo a ir al teatro.

I always use this example to make it clear to a student of English , that you cannot use this form in Spanish.

Actually:
No se ha encontrado ningún resultado para "estoy yendo a ir".
Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 258 de "estoy yendo a comprar
Resultados 1 - 9 de 9 de "estoy yendo a hablar

As you can see, this form is not used in Spanish. It is not actually *absolutely *wrong, but simply not the correct form to use when you want to express: going to future.

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this sounds especially wrong and makes it clearer, I think, if you say:

I am going to go to the theatre.

estoy yendo a ir al teatro.

I always use this example to make it clear to a student of English , that you cannot use this form in Spanish.

This one went over my head. Would you explain it again.

I am going to the theater (I'm going as we speak or tomorrow) is present tense or future in English.
I am going to go [will go] to the theater [tomorrow] is future tense in English. (this doesn't sound awkward to my ear)

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[del]Estoy yendo[/del] a hablar contigo.

I am going to talk to you.

Voy a hablar contigo

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In English there are 2 (I only know 2) exceptions to the "going to" structure.
We should never (don't have to) say "I am going to go..." but "I am going...." This is because we don't like to repeat the same word "go" in a sentence.
and we should never (don't have to)say "I am going to come ...." but "I am coming...." Why this is like this I have no idea.

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and we should never (don't have to)say "I am going to come ...." but "I am coming...." Why this is like this I have no idea.
Well, I can think of one situation it which they are not equivalent but ...

P.S. I just thought of a second; when shooting "craps".

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and we should never (don't have to)say "I am going to come ...." but "I am coming...." Why this is like this I have no idea.

I hate the usual "Google's argument" more than anyone, because Google's hits sometimes only prove that there are lots of people who can't write properly, but I couldn't help trying that "going to come" in Google. It returned 62,800,000 hits. Are they all wrong'

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Lazarus
It is more that the 62 million (more or less) "could be" wrong or uneccessary. What number of sites come back from a Google search are not really an indication of anything. As for "I am going to come" if you MUST have an indication of the future is better expressed as "I will be coming"

Samdie - No comment except of course what you intimate is only for adult readers of this thread and the spelling is different

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What number of sites come back from a Google search are not really an indication of anything'

Not many. There is too much rubbish to trust the Internet as a proper literary corpus.

As for "I am going to come" if you MUST have an indication of the future is better expressed as "I will be coming"

I can see your point, but... did you have a look at some of the sentences found by Google to see if any of them make any sense? Too often I've found myself, after saying that this or that cannot be said, but under certain circumstances it is actually possible.

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Lazarus
My sentence about the number of sites that Google come back with was badly worded. It was a statement not a question.
I must admit I did not look at what Google had to say. There probably are situations where we native speakers might say "I am going to come".
One could be for emphasis "I AM going to come, I promise!" for example.

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this sounds especially wrong and makes it clearer, I think, if you say:

I am going to go to the theatre.

**estoy yendo a ir al teatro. **

I always use this example to make it clear to a student of English , that you cannot use this form in Spanish.

This one went over my head. Would you explain it again.

I am going to the theater (I'm going as we speak or tomorrow) is present tense or future in English.

I am going to go [will go] to the theater [tomorrow] is future tense in English. (this doesn't sound awkward to my ear)

Sorry, Quentin, I meant the Spanish sentence. The direct translation of the second sentence makes it ususally very clear to a Spanish native, that you cannot translate that, you simply have to learn the form as it comes. As I said before, the English here is difficult for a Spanish person, as this form cannot be translated at all, sounds perfectly "chinese" to us.

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There probably are situations where we native speakers might say "I am going to come".

One could be for emphasis "I AM going to come, I promise!" for example.

Ian, my point was not that you actually say that, I am going to come or I'm going to go, however, the sentence is perfectly correct, even though it might sound better to use the simple "I'm going to the theatre". However, the tense is perfectly correct.
My point was that in Spanish, the same sentence is not only completely incorrect but sounds absolutely wrong and simply cannot be said.
The English sentence might **sound **wrong to a native, but is not incorrect grammatically speaking. In Spanish, you get both.

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I hate the usual "Google's argument" more than anyone, because Google's hits sometimes only prove that there are lots of people who can't write properly, but I couldn't help trying that "going to come" in Google. It returned 62,800,000 hits. Are they all wrong?

I can top that. I am going to go gets
276 million results

check out this explanation:
http://www.englishforums.com/English/IAmGoingToGoTo/bwdnb/post.htm

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Could this be a difference between British English and American English? "I am going to go" doesn't sound unusual to me. ("I'm gonna go to the store after I do the dishes.")

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