Si cocinas como caminas me como hasta la raspita | SpanishDict Answers
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Como se dice en Ingles: "Si cocinas como caminas me como hasta la raspita."

  • Posted May 1, 2009
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¿"la raspita" es otra manera de decir migajas? En ese caso en ingles seria: crumbs

Literalmente: "If you cook like you walk I'll even eat the crumbs"

Pero no estoy segura de raspita...veremos lo que digan los demás....

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Hi Yolii...la raspa (en Cuba)es lo que queda en el fondo de la cazuela. En Ingles no recuerdo como se dice. Las migajas nosotros llamamos a los bread crumbs que las hormigas se comen. LOL

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I don't think that there would be a literal translation, but it seems like you are reffering to a saying such as "clean with your tongue". In other words, you would lick the pan/pot/bowl clean leaving nothing because the person cooks so well.

I understand the idea that you are trying to get accross, but I don't think that there is a quasi liquid equivalent to 'crumb'. If it were purely liquid (i.e. water, pepsi, wine, etc.) I would simply say 'drop'.

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it's saying that if she walks the way she cooks I'll clean up the pot...but how do you say raspa in English...scrape is raspar, but raspa as a noun I don't know.

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Yeah, I don't think that there is a word for a saucy equivalent to crumb. If it's liquid, I say drop, if it's solid I say crumb. I don't know what I would say in regards to tomato sauce, for example. Probably drop, but that translates to 'gota'.

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No Nat...Yolii was asking if raspita meant crumb...raspa (in Cuba) is what's left over at the bottom of the pot when you are done cooking...
I think it could be something like: " If you cook like you walk, I'll scrape the pot". but that will be using raspa as a verb, as a noun all I can come up with is: " If you cook like you walk, I'll even eat the '''" - raspa? I don't know how to say that. I was also looking for another way to say it in English, something already established.

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I don't think that there would be a literal translation, but it seems like you are reffering to a saying such as "clean with your tongue". In other words, you would lick the pan/pot/bowl clean leaving nothing because the person cooks so well.

I understand the idea that you are trying to get accross, but I don't think that there is a quasi liquid equivalent to 'crumb'. If it were purely liquid (i.e. water, pepsi, wine, etc.) I would simply say 'drop'.

What is in a pot is usually a liquid or a quasi liquid. You woudn't be able to say what you are sayind word for word in English. You could say that you would scrape the bottom, but scraping the bottom of the pot doesn't make much sense other than the physical act of scraping the bottom of the pot. There is not a connotation there of you eating anything, but there is a connotation of you cleaning.

If I heard someone say that they were scraping the bottom of the pot, and they were referring to eating that would mean that they tried to get as much food out as possible, but there would still be small amounts of sauce in the bottom of the pot.

What would make the most sense is to "lick the pot/pan/bowl/spoon... whatever clean. You would not make a direct reference to what it is that you are licking, that object (the food) would be implied.

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conozco como la raspa, es lo que quede pegado en una olla cuando se cocina y
cuando la comida queda muy bien preparada se raspa ese resto de comida para saborearla completa.

otro termino es el raspado de la olla.

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En inglés:
"If you cook as well as you walk, I'll even eat the pot-scrapings!"

En esta frase se usa el sustantivo.

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En inglés:

"If you cook as well as you walk, I'll even eat the pot-scrapings!"

En esta frase se usa el sustantivo.

One might say, it tasted so good "I licked the bowl"

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If I understood what you meant by raspitas, it is the scourings of the pot. My attempt:

If you cook as well as you walk, I'll scour the pot for the last bite.

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You can also say 'scrape the bottom of the pot, or scrape the pot', when something tastes very good.

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The closes equivalent English word to -raspa- I can find is "leavings"

leavings

It can be used to refer to food but isn't specific to cooking and, as you can see from the discussion, isn't very common. As others have said, an English equivalent would more likely be:

If you cook the way you walk I would lick the pot clean.

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When I was a kid we called them "pan/pot drippings".

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There is no set equivalent in English, but if I heard "If you cook as well as you walk, I'll lick the plate," there would be no doubt in my mind as to the meaning. The use of lick (as suggested by Eddy above) is good because it has the obvious meaning and also has a double-entendre here that is pretty clear.

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