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My wife says the following," el carro es color rosa" ,(the car is color pink)
I say,"el carro es rosado" ( the car is pink)? who is correct and why?
Thank you for the help. I been away from this forum for a while, but I missed you all.

  • Posted Feb 8, 2009
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9 Answers

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Hey Gus,
I wouldn't be the one to answer your question of course, but I have been wondering why we weren't seeing lion/kitty in the forum for a while. Hopefully you've been having too much fun to waste any time on this. Seriously, I really was about to start asking if anybody had heard from you.

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Both rosa and rosado/a, as adjectives, translate to the English "pink." My choice would be rosado when modifying "carro" because of the masculine agreement.

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"Rosa" can be used as an invariant adjective (like most colours): un libro rosa, una casa rosa.
"Rosado" means pink, or looking like pink: rosy.

Una "piel rosa" is a skin that has been painted in pink.
Una "piel rosada" is a skin that resembles pink in some sort of way (because of the blood).

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Thank you all for the answer. My wife,finally came to leave here with me. So, I don´t have much time for myself at this point.

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Glad to hear that your absence is due to a happy reason. Congratulations.

Gus said:

Thank you all for the answer. My wife,finally came to leave here with me. So, I don´t have much time for myself at this point.

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Gus said:

Thank you all for the answer. My wife,finally came to leave here with me. So, I don´t have much time for myself at this point.

HI Gussmile Happy to see that your wife came to "live" (not leave) with you.

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Either version is correct.

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live? leave,? don't know. I took leave of my senses during my young life,got married, and now, my life is a life of a colorless Atum leave,hanging from a tree, just waiting for an strong wind to blow me over to the place where leaves go to live a lifeless life.

ite>Heidita said:

Gus said:

:

Thank you all for the answer. My wife,finally came to leave here with me. So, I don´t have much time for myself at this point.

HI Gussmile Happy to see that your wife came to "live" (not leave) with you.

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First of all, there is no rule which says you can't use ser with a past participle. "Soy aburrido," while not very flattering, is a perfectly valid sentence.

Secondly, rosar is actually a verb, but it doesn't mean what you might guess. The RAE indicates that rosado came from the Latin word rosatus.

[url=http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta'TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=rosado]http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta'TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=rosado[/url]

Winston said:

hm....i kinda have a question of my own to add...rosado looks like the past participle and in this case is used as an adjective...but arent past participles usually used with estar? i've never heard them used with ser. i could be wrong, but just my observation. but it could be slang, i mean common...who actually ever uses their own language right? i sure dont but idk....and since rosado appears to be a past participle, why is there no verb rosar? cuz that's what pps are usually made from right? so maybe it's just slang. but like poden said, you both are probably right.

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