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Buenas dias, tengo una pregunta, si alguien me puede ayudar con una palabra. "Carnosidad". Que significa en ingles? Es un enfermedad del ojo, pero no se que quiere decir en ingles.

  • Posted Oct 21, 2008
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10 Answers

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:

I've never heard of this in English or in Spanish, but after following Eddy's links, it must be "pterygium."

A very easy word, indeed! wink

It is a modern word derived from Greek, "pteryx" (wing) plus a suffix, meaning "like a wing". Not exactly a very clear or intuitive meaning, I'd say, but useful if you're into dinosaurs, like "archaeopteryx" (="old wing").

  • Oct 21, 2008
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Carnosidad means fleshy part, corpulence or fleshiness. At this moment I cannot find anything to do with the eyes.

  • Oct 21, 2008
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Carnosidad is being translated as "meat in the eye" which I think must be wrong. Here is a page which shows the eye problem, but again, no sensible English traslation.
[url=http://foro.univision.com/univision/board/message'board.id=remedioscaseros&message.id=30312]Carnosidad de los ojos[/url]

  • Oct 21, 2008
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You could also try the "Word Reference" site where quite a few people have been discussing this problem. Click below.
Carnosidad

  • Oct 21, 2008
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I've never heard of this in English or in Spanish, but after following Eddy's links, it must be "pterygium."

pterygium

  • Oct 21, 2008
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Lola, the Category for your discussion should be "Vocabulary and Grammar." Thanks!

  • Oct 21, 2008
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\"Pterygium (Carnosidad)

A pterygium is fleshy tissue that grows over the cornea (the clear front window of the eye), like a callus. It may remain small or may grow large enough to interfere with vision. A pterygium most commonly occurs at the inner corner of the eye, but can appear on the outer corner as well.\"
I got this from google.

  • Oct 21, 2008
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That's my point: at least "carnosidad" comes from the common adjective"carnoso" (with a lot of meat) and "-idad" (a thing that...), which any Spanish native could understand, or at least guess ("carnoso" comes from "carne", meat, plus "-oso", used to make adjective out of nouns) . The modern made-up Greek term, using "pteryx" (wing), fascinating as it may be for someone like me, it is deliberately confusing for anyone who hasn't studied classic Greek for years, so for most people it is a way of saying: "Sorry, but you're too think to understand what this means".

  • Oct 21, 2008
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how do I explain what a Pterygium is in spanish?

  • Sep 17, 2010
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Here's the Wiki link in español:

here

Someone else on the site gave me the useful hint that, often, you can look up a Wiki article in English and then click on español in the column to the left to get the same or a similar article in Spanish. It's a good way to find terms or phrases you've had trouble coming up with. Maybe this will help, cchapa,

  • Sep 17, 2010
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